Monthly Archives: March 2010

… without the rhetoric, lies, and political bias that have clouded a disastrous president’s enduring damage to the nation.

Lincoln unmasked : what you’re not supposed to know about dishonest Abe    New York : Crown Forum, c 2006  Thomas J. DiLorenzo Presidents , United States , Biography, Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. 223 p. ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [201]-211) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

What if you were told that the revered leader Abraham Lincoln was actually a political tyrant who stifled his opponents by suppressing their civil rights? What if you learned that the man so affectionately referred to as the “Great Emancipator” supported white supremacy and pledged not to interfere with slavery in the South? Would you suddenly start to question everything you thought you knew about Lincoln and his presidency?

You should.

Thomas J. DiLorenzo, who ignited a fierce debate about Lincoln’s legacy with his book The Real Lincoln, now presents a litany of stunning new revelations that explode the most enduring (and pernicious) myths about our sixteenth president. Marshaling an astonishing amount of new evidence, Lincoln Unmasked offers an alarming portrait of a political manipulator and opportunist who bears little resemblance to the heroic, stoic, and principled figure of mainstream history.

Did you know that Lincoln . . .

• did NOT save the union? In fact, Lincoln did more than any other individual to destroy the voluntary union the Founding Fathers recognized.

• did NOT want to free the slaves? Lincoln, who did not believe in equality of the races, wanted the Constitution to make slavery “irrevocable.”

• was NOT a champion of the Constitution? Contrary to his high-minded rhetoric, Lincoln repeatedly trampled on the Constitution—and even issued an arrest warrant for the chief justice of the United States!

• was NOT a great statesman? Lincoln was actually a warmonger who manipulated his own people into a civil war.

• did NOT utter many of his most admired quotations? DiLorenzo exposes a legion of statements that have been falsely attributed to Lincoln for generations—usually to enhance his image.

In addition to detailing Lincoln’s offenses against the principles of freedom, equality, and states’ rights, Lincoln Unmasked exposes the vast network of academics, historians, politicians, and other “gatekeepers” who have sanitized his true beliefs and willfully distorted his legacy. DiLorenzo reveals how the deification of Lincoln reflects a not-so-hidden agenda to expand the size and scope of the American state far beyond what the Founding Fathers envisioned — an expansion that Lincoln himself began.

The hagiographers have shaped Lincoln’s image to the point that it has become more fiction than fact. With Lincoln Unmasked, DiLorenzo shows us an Abraham Lincoln without the rhetoric, lies, and political bias that have clouded a disastrous president’s enduring damage to the nation.

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How capitalism saved America : the untold history of our country, from the Pilgrims to the present

How capitalism saved America : the untold history of our country, from the Pilgrims to the present    New York : Crown Forum, c 2004  Thomas J. DiLorenzo Capitalism , United States , History Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. viii, 295 p. ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 277-285) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Whether it’s Michael Moore or the New York Times, Hollywood or academia, a growing segment in America is waging a war on capitalism. We hear that greedy plutocrats exploit the American public; that capitalism harms consumers, the working class, and the environment; that the government needs to rein in capitalism; and on and on. Anticapitalist critiques have only grown more fevered in the wake of corporate scandals like Enron and WorldCom. Indeed, the presidential campaign has brought frequent calls to re-regulate the American economy.

But the anticapitalist arguments are pure bunk, as Thomas J. DiLorenzo reveals in How Capitalism Saved America. DiLorenzo, a professor of economics, shows how capitalism has made America the most prosperous nation on earth—and how the sort of government regulation that politicians and pundits endorse has hindered economic growth, caused higher unemployment, raised prices, and created many other problems. He propels the reader along with a fresh and compelling look at critical events in American history—covering everything from the Pilgrims to Bill Gates.

And just as he did in his last book, The Real Lincoln, DiLorenzo explodes numerous myths that have become conventional wisdom. How Capitalism Saved America reveals:

• How the introduction of a capitalist system saved the Pilgrims from starvation

• How the American Revolution was in large part a revolt against Britain’s stifling economic controls

• How the so-called robber barons actually improved the lives of millions of Americans by providing newer and better products at lower prices

• How the New Deal made the Great Depression worse

• How deregulation got this country out of the energy crisis of the 1970s—and was not the cause of recent blackouts in California and the Northeast

How Capitalism Saved America is popular history at its explosive best.

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By 1931, nothing on earth could stop a bacterial infection once it started. . . . But all that was about to change. . . .

The demon under the microscope : from battlefield hospitals to Nazi labs, one doctor’s heroic search for the world’s first miracle drug    New York : Harmony Books, c 2006  Thomas Hager Sulfonamides , Therapeutic use , History Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. viii, 340 p. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [321]-330) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

The Nazis discovered it. The Allies won the war with it. It conquered diseases, changed laws, and single-handedly launched the era of antibiotics. This incredible discovery was sulfa, the first antibiotic. In The Demon Under the Microscope, Thomas Hager chronicles the dramatic history of the drug that shaped modern medicine.

Sulfa saved millions of lives—among them those of Winston Churchill and Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr.—but its real effects are even more far reaching. Sulfa changed the way new drugs were developed, approved, and sold; transformed the way doctors treated patients; and ushered in the era of modern medicine. The very concept that chemicals created in a lab could cure disease revolutionized medicine, taking it from the treatment of symptoms and discomfort to the eradication of the root cause of illness.

A strange and colorful story, The Demon Under the Microscope illuminates the vivid characters, corporate strategy, individual idealism, careful planning, lucky breaks, cynicism, heroism, greed, hard work, and the central (though mistaken) idea that brought sulfa to the world. This is a fascinating scientific tale with all the excitement and intrigue of a great suspense novel.

For thousands of years, humans had sought medicines with which they could defeat contagion, and they had slowly, painstakingly, won a few battles: some vaccines to ward off disease, a handful of antitoxins. A drug or two was available that could stop parasitic diseases once they hit, tropical maladies like malaria and sleeping sickness. But the great killers of Europe, North America, and most of Asia—pneumonia, plague, tuberculosis, diphtheria, cholera, meningitis—were caused not by parasites but by bacteria, much smaller, far different microorganisms. By 1931, nothing on earth could stop a bacterial infection once it started. . . .

But all that was about to change. . . . —from The Demon Under the Microscope

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The writings presented in this volume shed tremendous light, both on the character of T. E. Lawrence and the current situation in the Middle East.

T.E. Lawrence in war and peace : an anthology of the military writings of Lawrence of Arabia    London : Greenhill Books ; Mechanicsburg, PA, USA : Stackpole Books, 2005  T.E. Lawrence edited and presented by Malcolm Brown ; foreword by Michael Clarke World War, 1914-1918 , Personal narratives, British, Lawrence, T. E. (Thomas Edward), 1888-1935 Hardcover. 320 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [308]-309) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

The writings presented in this volume shed tremendous light, both on the character of T. E. Lawrence and the current situation in the Middle East. Despite being written more than seventy years ago, the thoughts of Lawrence of Arabia remain remarkably pertinent. This collection includes Lawrence’s wartime reports from the desert, along with later writings in which Lawrence attempts to cope with the consequences of war in the circumstances of peace. Many of the pieces have previously only been issued in limited editions.

T. E. Lawrence in War and Peace is an invaluable companion volume to Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which offers a self-portrait of its author long before he became an international celebrity. It gives us the man before the myth, writing fluently, vividly and with a total command of his subject. This edition has been compiled by the acclaimed writer Malcolm Brown, who is the co-author of A Touch of Genius: The Life of T. E. Lawrence and edited The Letters of T. E. Lawrence.

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Full House deftly reveals the shortcomings of the popular reasoning we apply to everyday life situations.

Full house : the spread of excellence from Plato to Darwin    New York : Harmony Books, c 1996  Stephen Jay Gould Evolution (Biology)Natural history, Excellence, Nature Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. 244 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Bibliography: p. [231]-237. Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Few would question the truism that humankind is the crowning achievement of evolution; that the defining thrust of life’s history yields progress over time from the primitive and simple to the more advanced and complex; that the disappearance of .400 hitting in baseball is a fact to be bemoaned; or that identifying an existing trend can be helpful in making important life decisions. Few, that is, except Stephen Jay Gould who, in his new book Full House: The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin, proves that all of these intuitive truths are, in fact, wrong.

“All of these mistaken beliefs arise out of the same analytical flaw in our reasoning, our Platonic tendency to reduce a broad spectrum to a single, pinpointed essence,” says Gould. “This way of thinking allows us to confirm our most ingrained biases that humans are the supreme being on this planet; that all things are inherently driven to become more complex; and that almost any subject can be expressed and understood in terms of an average.”

In Full House, Gould shows why a more accurate way of understanding our world (and the history of life) is to look at a given subject within its own context, to see it as a part of a spectrum of variation rather than as an isolated “thing” and then to reconceptualize trends as expansion or contraction of this “full house” of variation, and not as the progress or degeneration of an average value, or single thing. When approached in such a way, the disappearance of .400 hitting becomes a cause for celebration, signaling not a decline in greatness but instead an improvement in the overall level of play in baseball; trends become subject to suspicion, and too often, only a tool of those seeking to advance a particular agenda; and the “Age of Man” (a claim rooted in hubris, not in fact) more accurately becomes the “Age of Bacteria.”

“The traditional mode of thinking has led us to draw many conclusions that don’t make satisfying sense,” says Gould. “It tells us that .400 hitting has disappeared because batters have gotten worse, but how can that be true when record performances have improved in almost any athletic activity?” In a personal eureka!, Gould realized that we were looking at the picture backward, and that a simple conceptual inversion would resolve a number of the paradoxes of the conventional view.

While Full House deftly reveals the shortcomings of the popular reasoning we apply to everyday life situations, Gould also explores his beloved realm of natural history as well. Whether debunking the myth of the successful evolution of the horse (he grants that the story still deserves distinction, but as the icon of evolutionary failure); presenting evidence that the vaunted “progress of life” is really random motion away from simple beginnings, not directed impetus toward complexity; or relegating the kingdoms of Animalai and Plantae to their proper positions on the genealogical chart for all of life (as mere twigs on one of the three bushes), Full House asks nothing less than that we reconceptualize our view of life in a fundamental way.

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