Two poisoned pen letters posing as history from a hack journalist who leans so far to the left as to be insupportable as well as unsupportable.


Hitler’s pope : the secret history of Pius XII John Cornwell Europe Politics and government 1918-1945 New York, N.Y. : Viking, 1999 Hardcover. First edition, later printing. xii, 430 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [413]-417) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG

Eugenio Pacelli, Pope Pius XII, has long been the subject of controversy over his failure to speak out against Hitler’s Final Solution. In Hitler’s Pope, award-winning journalist and Roman Catholic John Cornwell shows that, even well before the Holocaust, Pope Pius XII was instrumental in negotiating an accord that helped the Nazis rise to unhindered power–and sealed the fate of the Jews in Europe. Drawing upon secret Vatican and Jesuit archives to which he had exclusive access, Cornwell tells the full, tragic story of how narcissism, longstanding personal antipathy for the Jews, and political and spiritual ambition combined to make Pius the most dangerous churchman in history. A firm and final indictment of Pius XII’s papacy, Hitler’s Pope is also a searing exploration of its lingering consequences for the Catholic church today.

Hitler’s scientists : science, war, and the devil’s pact John Cornwell World War, 1939-1945 Science Germany New York : Viking, 2003 Hardcover. First edition and printing. xvi, 535 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [501]-512) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG

Covering the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitler’s regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, Hitler’s Scientists raises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.

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