How defeat in the Colonies helped the British achieve victory over Napoleon – three titles from Mark Urban.


Fusiliers : eight years with the Redcoats in America Mark Urban Great Britain. Army. Royal Welch Fusiliers  History  18th century London : Faber, 2007 Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. xv, 384 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps, ports. (some col.) ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 367-374) and index.  Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

The American Revolution from a unique perspective–as seen through the eyes of a redcoat regiment.

From Lexington Green in 1775 to Yorktown in 1781, one British regiment marched thousands of miles and fought a dozen battles to uphold British rule in America: the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Their story, and that of all the soldiers England sent across the Atlantic, is one of the few untold sagas of the American Revolution, one that sheds light on the war itself and offers surprising, at times unsettling, insights into the way the war was conducted on both sides.

Drawing on a wealth of previously unused primary accounts, and with compelling narrative flair, Mark Urban reveals the inner life of the 23rd Regiment, the Fusiliers—and through it, of the British army as a whole — as it fought one of the pivotal campaigns of world history. Describing how British troops adopted new tactics and promoted new leaders, Urban shows how the foundations were laid for the redcoats’ subsequent heroic performance against Napoleon. Fighting the climactic battles of the Revolution in the American south, the Fusiliers became one of the crack regiments of the army, never believing themselves to have been defeated.

But the letters from members of the 23rd and other archival accounts reveal much more than battle details. Living the Revolution day-to-day, the Fusiliers witnessed acts of kindness and atrocity on both sides unrecorded in histories of the war. Their observations bring the conflict down to human scale and provide a unique insight into soldiering in the late eighteenth century. Fusiliers will challenge the prevailing stereotypes of the enemy redcoats and offer an invaluable new perspective on a defining period in American history.

 

Wellington’s rifles : six years to Waterloo with England’s legendary sharpshooters Mark Urban Napoleonic Wars, 1800-1815 Regimental histories, Great Britain. Army. Regiment of Foot, 95th New York : Walker & Company, c 2004 Hardcover. First edition and printing.  xiv, 351p. : col. ill., maps ; 25cm. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG

The 95th Rifles was one of history’s great fighting units, and Mark Urban brings them and the Napoleonic War gloriously to life in this unique chronicle. Focusing especially on six soldiers in the first battalion, Urban tells the Rifles’ story from May 25, 1809, when they shipped out to join Wellington’s army in Spain, through the battle of Waterloo in June 1815.

Drawing on diaries, letters, and other personal accounts, Urban has fashioned a vivid narrative that allows readers to feel the thrill and horror of famous battles, the hardship of the march across Europe, the bravery and camaraderie of a nineteenth century Band of Brothers whose innovative tactics created the modern notion of infantryman.

 

 

The man who broke Napoleon’s codes : the story of George Scovell Mark Urban Peninsular War, 1807-1814 Campaigns  Great Britain. Army Officers  Cryptographers, Biography, Scovell, George, 1774-1861 New York, HarperCollins Publishers, 2002 Hardcover First American edition and printing. xiv, 333 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

 

 

 

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