With the eye of a master storyteller, the premier military historian of his generation puts us right on the battlefield, both at home and abroad over a 50 year span.


The Long Gray Line : The American Journey of West Point’s Class of 1966 Rick Atkinson United States Military Academy. Class of 1966 Biography Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 1989 Hardcover.  xiii, 592 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [573]-578 and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG

This is the story of the twenty-five-year adventure of the generation of officers who fought in Vietnam. With novelistic detail, Atkinson tells the story of West Point’s Class of 1966 primarily through the experiences of three classmates and the women they loved – from the boisterous cadet years and youthful romances to the fires of Vietnam, where dozens of their classmates died and hundreds more grew disillusioned, to the hard peace and family adjustments that followed.
The rich cast of characters includes Douglas MacArthur, William Westmoreland, and a score of other memorable figures. The West Point Class of 1966 straddled a fault line in American history, and Rick Atkinson’s masterly book speaks for a generation of American men and women about innocence, patriotism, and the price we pay for our dreams.

In the company of soldiers : a chronicle of combat New York : H. Holt, 2004  Rick Atkinson Iraq War, 2003- , Campaigns, United States. Army. Airborne Division, 101st , History , 21st century Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xi, 319 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm. Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

For soldiers in the 101st Airborne Division, the road to Baghdad began with a midnight flight out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in late February 2003. For Rick Atkinson, who would spend nearly two months covering the division for The Washington Post, the war in Iraq provided a unique opportunity to observe today’s U.S. Army in combat. Now, in this extraordinary account of his odyssey with the 101st, Atkinson presents an intimate and revealing portrait of the soldiers who fight the expeditionary wars that have become the hallmark of our age.

At the center of Atkinson’s drama stands the compelling figure of Major General David H. Petraeus, described by one comrade as “the most competitive man on the planet.” Atkinson spent virtually all day every day at Petraeus’s elbow in Iraq, where he had an unobstructed view of the stresses, anxieties, and large joys of commanding 17,000 soldiers in combat. Atkinson watches Petraeus wrestle with innumerable tactical conundrums and direct several intense firefights he watches him teach, goad, and lead his troops and his subordinate commanders. And all around Petraeus, we see the men and women of a storied division grapple with the challenges of waging war in an unspeakably harsh environment.

In the Company of Soldiers is a compelling, utterly fresh view of the modern American soldier in action.

Advertisements

Comments Off on With the eye of a master storyteller, the premier military historian of his generation puts us right on the battlefield, both at home and abroad over a 50 year span.

Filed under Book Reviews

Comments are closed.