Send this to San Felipe by Express night & day… To The People of Texas and All Americans… William Barrett Travis


If you can read the following lines without getting a lump in your throat and a tear in your eye I feel sorry for you. This is one of the great stories of heroism and tragedy and triumph and it had a cast that no Hollywood epic could ever match. This is a great story and a fine telling of it.

Fellow citizens & compatriots——

I am besieged, by a thousand or more of the Mexicans under Santa Anna —– I have sustained a continual Bombardment & cannonade for 24 hours & have not lost a man —–

The enemy has demanded a Surrender at discretion, otherwise, the garrison are to be put to the sword, if the fort is taken —– I have answered the demand with a cannon
shot, & our flag still waves proudly from the wall —– I shall never Surrender or retreat

Then, I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism & every thing dear to the American character, to come to our aid,with all dispatch —– The enemy is receiving reinforcements daily & will no doubt increase to three or four thousand in four or five days.

If this callis neglected, I am deter mined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country —– Victory or Death

William Barret Travis
Lt. Col. Comdt

P. S. The lord is on our side- When the enemy appeared in sight  we had not three bushels of corn— We have since found in deserted houses 80 or 90 bushels & got into
the walls 20 or 30 head of Beeves—

Travis

A line in the sand : the Alamo in blood and memory        Randy Roberts, James S. Olson Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.) ,Siege, 1836 ,Influence New York : Free Press, c 2001 Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing.     ix, 356 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG

In late February and early March of 1836, the Mexican Army under the command of General Antonio López de Santa Anna besieged a small force of Anglo and Tejano rebels at a mission known as the Alamo. The defenders of the Alamo were in an impossible situation. They knew very little of the events taking place outside the mission walls. They did not have much of an understanding of Santa Anna or of his government in Mexico City. They sent out contradictory messages, they received contradictory communications, they moved blindly and planned in the dark. And in the dark early morning of March 6, they died.

In that brief, confusing, and deadly encounter, one of America’s most potent symbols was born. The story of the last stand at the Alamo grew from a Texas rallying cry, to a national slogan, to a phenomenon of popular culture and presidential politics. Yet it has been a hotly contested symbol from the first. Questions remain about what really happened: Did William Travis really draw a line in the sand? Did Davy Crockett die fighting, surrounded by the bodies of two dozen of the enemy? And what of the participants’ motives and purposes? Were the Texans justified in their rebellion? Were they sincere patriots making a last stand for freedom and liberty, or were they a ragtag collection of greedy men-on-the-make, washed-up politicians, and backwoods bullies, Americans bent on extending American slavery into a foreign land?

The full story of the Alamo — from the weeks and months that led up to the fateful encounter to the movies and speeches that continue to remember it today — is a quintessential story of America’s past and a fascinating window into our collective memory. In A Line in the Sand, acclaimed historians Randy Roberts and James Olson use a wealth of archival sources, including the diary of Jose Enrique de la Peña, along with important and little-used Mexican documents, to retell the story of the Alamo for a new generation of Americans. They explain what happened from the perspective of all parties, not just Anglo and Mexican soldiers, but also Tejano allies and bystanders. They delve anew into the mysteries of Crockett’s final hours and Travis’s famous rhetoric. Finally, they show how preservationists, television and movie producers, historians, and politicians have become the Alamo’s major interpreters.  John Wayne, and scores of journalists and cultural critics have used the Alamo to contest the very meaning of America, and thereby helped us all to “remember the Alamo.”

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