The newspapers! Sir, they are the most villanous, licentious, abominable, infernal— Not that I ever read them! No, I make it a rule never to look into a newspaper… Richard Brinsley Sheridan


Infamous scribblers : the Founding Fathers and the rowdy beginnings of American journalism Eric Burns American newspapers Journalism United States History 18th century New York : Public Affairs, c 2006 Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. x, 467 p. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [441]-449) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Infamous Scribblers is a perceptive and witty exploration of the most volatile period in the history of the American press. News correspondent  Eric Burns tells of Ben Franklin, Alexander Hamilton and Sam Adams — the leading journalists among the Founding Fathers; of George Washington and John Adams, the leading disdainers of journalists; and Thomas Jefferson, the leading manipulator of journalists.

These men and the writers who abused and praised them in print included the incendiary James Franklin, Ben’s brother and one of the first muckrakers; the high minded Thomas Paine; the hatchet man James Callender, and a rebellious crowd of propagandists, pamphleteers, and publishers.

It was Washington who gave this book its title. He once wrote of his dismay at being “buffited in the public prints by a set of infamous scribblers.” The journalism of the era was often partisan, fabricated, overheated, scandalous, sensationalistic and no different than the waste of paper and ink that passes for journalism today. Despite its flaws — even because of some of them — the participants hashed out publicly the issues that would lead America to declare its independence and, after the war, to determine what sort of nation it would be.

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