“Nothing has given me so much chagrin as the Intelligence that the Federal party were thinking seriously of supporting Mr. Burr for president. I should consider the execution of the plan as devoting the country and signing their own death warrant. Mr. Burr will probably make stipulations, but he will laugh in his sleeve while he makes them and will break them the first moment it may serve his purpose.” Alexander Hamilton


What a wonderful idea. A constitutional amendment requiring all elections be settled by duels. Even if the wrong candidate is the better shot we would still have 50% fewer politicians!

Duel : Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the future of America    New York, NY : Basic Books, c 1999 Thomas Fleming Burr-Hamilton Duel, Weehawken, N.J., 1804 Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. xiii, 446 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 407-427) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

All school children know the story of the fatal duel between Hamilton and Burr – but do they really? In this remarkable retelling, Thomas Fleming takes the reader into the post-revolutionary world of 1804, a chaotic and fragile time in the young country as well as a time of tremendous global instability.

The success of the French Revolution and the proclamation of Napoleon as First Consul for Life had enormous impact on men like Hamilton and Burr, feeding their own political fantasies at a time of perceived Federal government weakness and corrosion. Their hunger for fame spawned antagonisms that wreaked havoc on themselves and their families and threatened to destabilize the fragile young American republic. From that poisonous brew came the tangle of regret and anger and ambition that drove the two to their murderous confrontation in Weehawken, New Jersey.

Readers will find this is popular narrative history at its most authoritative, and authoritative history at its most readable.

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Comments Off on “Nothing has given me so much chagrin as the Intelligence that the Federal party were thinking seriously of supporting Mr. Burr for president. I should consider the execution of the plan as devoting the country and signing their own death warrant. Mr. Burr will probably make stipulations, but he will laugh in his sleeve while he makes them and will break them the first moment it may serve his purpose.” Alexander Hamilton

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