An adventure is only an inconvenience rightly considered. An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered. Gilbert K. Chesterton


How to make friends and oppress people : classic travel advice for the gentleman adventurer New York : Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2007 Vic Darkwood Travel Social aspects Handbooks, manuals, etc. Hardcover. 1st U.S. ed. and printing. 250 p. : ill. ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-249). Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG  

No traveler to date has matched the intrepid 19th-century gentleman for his bravery, derring-do, and ability to make a perfect cup of tea in the most malarial of climes. But the sun has set on the golden age of exploration, and the records of these fearless, mustachioed adventurers have vanished from the shelves. In their place have appeared timorous travel guides written by authors who could hardly locate Rhodesia on a classroom globe let alone comment on the proper etiquette of an Italian duel.

Now, with the publication of Vic Darkwood’s How to Make Friends and Oppress People, at long last today’s aspiring adventurers can avail themselves of the best of classic travel advice on such invaluable topics as:

  • Using Anthills as Ovens
  • Hunting Elephants and Hippos with a Javelin
  • Sleeping on a Billiard Table as a Means of Avoiding Vermin
  • Digging a Well with a Pointy Stick

Fully illustrated with over 150 drawings and woodcuts, this inestimable collection of wisdom drawn from actual 19th and early 20th-century guidebooks will prove essential to any traveler looking to enjoy his excursion abroad or hoping to avoid death at the hands of inhospitable natives.

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