We define and declare by these Our letters that, notwithstanding whatever may have been or may be said to the contrary, the said Indians and all other people who may later be discovered by Christians, are by no means to be deprived of their liberty or the possession of their property, even though they be outside the faith of Jesus Christ; and that they may and should, freely and legitimately, enjoy their liberty and the possession of their property; nor should they be in any way enslaved; should the contrary happen, it shall be null and have no effect… Paul III, Sublimis Deus 1537


The memoirs of Fray Servando Teresa de Mier    New York ; Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1998 Fray Servando Teresa de Mier ; translated from the Spanish by Helen Lane ; edited and with an introduction by Susana Rotker Dominicans Mexico Biography, Mier Noriega y Guerra, Jose Servando Teresa de, 1763-1827 Travel Europe Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. lxiv, 242 p. ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-242). Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

The story of Fray Servando’s life in exile is a vivid account of the adventures of one of the most original ideologues of Latin American independence.

On December 12, 1794, Fray Servando preached a sermon in Mexico City claiming that the Indies had been converted by St. Thomas long before the Spaniards arrived. This was a subversive and controversial notion because it took away the rationale for the Spanish conquest of the New World – the conversion of the heathen.

Colonial authorities arrested him and he was exiled to Spain where he was imprisoned by his own Dominican order. Servando escaped and spent 10 years in exile traveling throughout Europe disguised as a French priest, issuing revolutionary manifestos and sermons. He returned to Mexico after Independence and served the new government before his death.

This is the only available English translation of The Memoirs of Servando Teresa de Mier.

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Comments Off on We define and declare by these Our letters that, notwithstanding whatever may have been or may be said to the contrary, the said Indians and all other people who may later be discovered by Christians, are by no means to be deprived of their liberty or the possession of their property, even though they be outside the faith of Jesus Christ; and that they may and should, freely and legitimately, enjoy their liberty and the possession of their property; nor should they be in any way enslaved; should the contrary happen, it shall be null and have no effect… Paul III, Sublimis Deus 1537

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