At last the men who had conquered the conquerors of Europe had themselves met defeat. Andrew Jackson and his rough riflemen had worsted, in fair fight, a far larger force of the best of Wellington’s veterans, and had accomplished what no French marshal and no French troops had been able to accomplish throughout the long war in the Spanish peninsula. For a week the sullen British lay in their lines; then, abandoning their heavy artillery, they marched back to the ships and sailed for Europe… Theodore Roosevelt


Print shows a campaign portrait of Andrew Jackson issued during the presidential election of 1828. Jackson is accompanied by the words “Protector & Defender of Beauty & Booty. Orleans,” referring to Jackson’s spectacular War of 1812 victory at New Orleans. It is similar in size and format to frontispiece portraits found in the numerous popular biographies of Jackson published during the campaign… Library of Congress Collection

The generals : Andrew Jackson, Sir Edward Pakenham, and the road to the Battle of New Orleans New York : New York University Press, 2005  Benton Rain Patterson New Orleans, Battle of, New Orleans, La., 1815 Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. ix, 289 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-274) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

In December of 1814, American forces led by Major General Andrew Jackson moved into the city of New Orleans. For the next six weeks, Jackson’s ragtag troops of militiamen, free blacks, Indians, and pirates furiously defended the city against Britain’s elite army, led by Lieutenant General Sir Edward Pakenham. In the bloody confrontation of the two armies, the American underdog army decisively defeated Sir Edward Pakenham’s British troops.

The Generals tells the dramatic story of the battle between Andrew Jackson and Sir Edward Pakenham for the “booty and beauty” of New Orleans in the winter of 1814–1815. The Battle of New Orleans was the last battle in the War of 1812, which cost Pakenham his life and propelled Andrew Jackson into the national prominence that would eventually lead to his presidency.

The Generals provides a detailed and intimate look at both the personal and professional lives of Jackson and Pakenham, demonstrating how their paths twisted and turned until they inevitably met each other on the battlefield outside of New Orleans.

Benton Rain Patterson leads readers through the captivating tale of a central battle in American military history and subsequently brings the biographies of these two great generals into full light.

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