The Alamo is military history at its best: a social, political, economic, strategic, and tactical examination of the Texas War for Independence, one of the most dramatic episodes of our colorful past.


The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, September 30, 1835 to April 21, 1836 Conshohocken, PA : Combined Books, c 1992 Albert A. Nofi Texas History Revolution, 1835-1836, Alamo, San Antonio, Texas Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. 222 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 209-212) and index. Filmography: p. 212-214. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG   

It was a small war—probably no more than 6,500 men were ever engaged in a single action, both sides taken together. It was a short war too, lasting only about seven months. And it was fought in what was, at the time, one of the most obscure corners of the earth. Yet the Texas War for Independence has become a heroic conflict of legendary proportions.

Very few balanced accounts of Texas’s epic struggle for independence have been written. Here historian Albert A. Nofi provides a splendid chronicle of the events and personalities of the war. He clearly explicates the battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto, carefully exploring the legends that have grown around them, and exposing the truth behind the myths.

The Alamo offers a strategic and tactical analysis of the war, technical information about the weapons used by both sides, strength and casualty data, orders of battles, information on the financing of Texas freedom, portraits of both Texan and Mexican personalities, and the story of a little-known war at sea.

Also included are maps of military movements, the most detailed tactical map of the Battle of San Jacinto available to date, and a number of fascinating illustrations.

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