How many ages hence Shall this our lofty scene be acted over In states unborn and accents yet unknown!


When that the poor have cried, Cæsar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.

The ides : Caesar’s murder and the war for Rome Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c 2010      Stephen Dando-Collins Caesar, Julius Assassination Hardcover. xv, 269 p. : maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG  

For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honourable men.

The assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Two thousand years after it occurred, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring death on himself by planning to make himself king of Rome? Was Mark Antony aware of the plot, and let it go forward? Who wrote Antony‘s script after Caesar’s death?

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Cæsar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones.

Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian Stephen Dando-Collins takes you to the world of ancient Rome and recaptures the drama of Caesar’s demise and the chaotic aftermath as the vicious struggle for power between Antony and Octavian unfolded. For the first time, he shows how the religious festivals and customs of the day impacted on the way the assassination plot unfolded. He shows, too, how the murder was almost avoided at the last moment.

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Men at some time are masters of their fates:

Unraveling the many mysteries surrounding the murder of Julius Caesar in a compelling history that is packed with intrigue and written with the pacing of a first-rate mystery, The Ides will challenge what you think you know about Julius Caesar and the Roman Empire.

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