It’s not what you pay a man, but what he costs you that counts… Will Rogers


Will rogers also said that, The farmer has to be an optimist or he wouldn’t still be a farmer. Engaging in a little political conjugation we can state that the utopian equivalent of a farmer is an agrarian populist – generally a fellow who could not make a living as a farmer but who knows everything there is to know about farming. In modern parlance he is likely to go to bed after Letterman rather than getting up after Letterman to start his day’s work. Somehow or another FDR’s administration got infested with the agrarian populists and rather than dealing with them like boll weevils they were elevated to the highest echelons of policy – by the time their work is finished we will be net importers of food. Finishing where we started we go back to Will Rogers, There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves – Marvin Jones was the third type!

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Marvin Jones, the public life of an agrarian advocate College Station: Texas A&M University Press, c 1980 Irvin M. May, Jr. Agriculture and state United States History, Jones, Marvin, 1886-1976 Hardcover. 1st. ed. xv, 296 p., [4] leaves of plates: ill.; 24 cm. Bibliography: p. [263]-282. Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with  dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/G  

House agriculture committee decides on new production control plan. Washington, D.C., Nov. 16. A production control plan based on [...] instead of marketing quotas as asked by Secretary Wallace was decided on by the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Cotton. Rep. Hampton P. Fuller subcommittee chairman, (center) proposed the which received full endorsement of Chairman Marvin Jones of the full committee. Left to right: Rep. Clifford R. Hope, Republican of Kansas and minority leader on Agriculture Committee; Rep. Hampton Fulmer of South Carolina; and Rep. Marvin Jones

House agriculture committee decides on new production control plan. Washington, D.C., Nov. 16. A production control plan based on […] instead of marketing quotas as asked by Secretary Wallace was decided on by the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Cotton. Rep. Hampton P. Fuller subcommittee chairman, (center) proposed the which received full endorsement of Chairman Marvin Jones of the full committee. Left to right: Rep. Clifford R. Hope, Republican of Kansas and minority leader on Agriculture Committee; Rep. Hampton Fulmer of South Carolina; and Rep. Marvin Jones


Son of a north Texas wheat and cotton farming family, Marvin Jones grew up with strong agrarian roots and a taste for Democratic politics. Elected to Congress in 1916, he joined the Texas delegation and learned the political ropes from John Nance Garner. Named to the House Agriculture Committee, Jones later became its chairman and directed the destiny of New Deal agricultural legislation in the House of Representatives.

Congressional milking contest declared draw. Washington, D.C., June 9. The four congressmen competing for mlking championship of the 75th Congress today on the Capitol plaza deserted their cows to make speeches when the discovered a microphone nearby. Halting the contest in mid-squirt, Rep. Marvin Jones, acting as referee, declared it a draw after the contestants could show no more than a pint of milk for ten minutes of effort. Left to right: Rep. harry R. Sheppard, Calif.; Rep. Gerald J. Boileau, Wisconsin; Rep. Walter M. Pierce, Oregan; Rep. harold Knutson, Minnesota. Radio announcer Lee Everett holding the mike

Congressional milking contest declared draw. Washington, D.C., June 9. The four congressmen competing for mlking championship of the 75th Congress today on the Capitol plaza deserted their cows to make speeches when the discovered a microphone nearby. Halting the contest in mid-squirt, Rep. Marvin Jones, acting as referee, declared it a draw after the contestants could show no more than a pint of milk for ten minutes of effort. Left to right: Rep. harry R. Sheppard, Calif.; Rep. Gerald J. Boileau, Wisconsin; Rep. Walter M. Pierce, Oregan; Rep. harold Knutson, Minnesota. Radio announcer Lee Everett holding the mike

Jones’s Panhandle district lay in the 1930s Dust Bowl. As Roosevelt’s chairman of the Agriculture Committee, he fought for New Deal farm legislation — low-interest loans and mortgages for farmers, soil conservation, farm subsidies, agricultural research, and new markets for farm products. Many of today’s federal agricultural policies were born in his committee room.

Secretary of Agriculture confers with Congressional cotton bloc. Washington, D.C., Feb. 1. Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace today conferred with members of the Congressional Cotton Bloc regarding plans for reducing the cotton surplus held under government loans. Senators were unable to reach a final agreement upon a plan which would permit farmers to retire cotton from loan in lieu of planting compatible acreage. Wallace is picture with Rep. Marvin Jones, left, Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, and Senator Ellison 'Cotton Ed' Smith, Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee

Secretary of Agriculture confers with Congressional cotton bloc. Washington, D.C., Feb. 1. Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace today conferred with members of the Congressional Cotton Bloc regarding plans for reducing the cotton surplus held under government loans. Senators were unable to reach a final agreement upon a plan which would permit farmers to retire cotton from loan in lieu of planting compatible acreage. Wallace is picture with Rep. Marvin Jones, left, Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, and Senator Ellison ‘Cotton Ed’ Smith, Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee

As war food administrator in World War II, Jones put his knowledge and experience to use in balancing U.S. agricultural production with military and civilian food requirements. At war’s end he accepted a judgeship on the U.S. Court of Claims and later became chief judge, noted for just, compassionate decisions couched in everyman’s language. Jones was a gentle, hard-working man, a realist who extolled the rural life but accepted the urbanization of America. More reserved than his mentor, Garner, less shrewd than his good friend Sam Rayburn, Jones probably surpassed them both in terms of real achievement. Using archival sources and Jones’s memoirs as well as his own numerous interviews with Judge Jones, Irvin May provides a solid account of this transplanted Texan who remained the farmer’s advocate throughout his life.
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