Thus lynch law held sway in the West until civilization spread into the Territories and the orderly processes of law took its place. The emergency no longer existing, lynching gradually disappeared… Ida B. Wells


A lynching in the heartland: race and memory in America New York: Palgrave, 2001 James H. Madison Lynching Indiana Marion History 20th century Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xii, 204 p.: ill., maps; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [183]-195) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

George Meadows, murderer & rapist, lynched on scene of his last crime. Photograph shows black man with hands bound hanging from a tree. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

George Meadows, murderer & rapist, lynched on scene of his last crime. Photograph shows black man with hands bound hanging from a tree. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

On a hot summer night in 1930, three black teenagers accused of murdering a young white man and raping his girlfriend waited for justice in an Indiana jail. A mob dragged them from the jail and lynched two of them. No one in Marion, Indiana was ever punished for the murders. In this gripping account, James H. Madison refutes the popular perception that lynching was confined to the South, and clarifies 20th century America’s painful encounters with race, justice, and memory.

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