Design has taken the place of what sailing used to be… Dennis Conner


And, he might have added, writing about design has taken the place of writing about sailing. Although not our favorite author, Van Wyck Brooks wrote No one is fit to judge until he has rounded Cape Horn in a sailing vessel, until he has bumped into two or three icebergs, until he has been lost in the sands of the desert, until he has spent a few years in the House of the Dead and more than a little of his scribbling was about men, ships and the sea. If you would like to be able to dip at leisure into the literature of the sea this is the book for you.

neptune

Thirty years of the American Neptune Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1972 Ernest S. Dodge, editor American neptune, Seafaring life  Hardcover. xiii, 300 p. illus. 25 cm. Includes bibliographical  references. Clean, tight and  strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting,  underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG   

Since 1941, when Samuel Eliot Morison and Walter Muir Whitehill were among its founders, The American Neptune has been America’s premier maritime journal.

The journal’s articles, written with clarity and scholarly substance, are of interest to all who enjoy accounts of ships, the seas, and those who’ve sailed them – for mercantile gain, defending their nation’s interest, or the love of voyaging and exploration. They cover a wide range of subject matter (objects, people, events), geographical areas (international as well as American) and eras (millenia ago through today) and are for scholars, professionals and enthusiasts.

The American Neptune is handsomely printed, well illustrated and has full-color photographic reproductions of distinctive maritime entities on its covers.

The journal was issued as a quarterly (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall) until the Winter issue of 2002. A survey of sample issues appears an the following webpage http://pem.org/sites/neptune/default.htm.

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