America’s present need is not heroics but healing; not nostrums but normalcy; not revolution but restoration… Warren G. Harding


1920001

I don’t know much about Americanism, but it’s a damn good word with which to carry an election… Warren G. Harding

The 1920 Republican nomination took 10 ballots before it was decided in the proverbial smoke-filled room in favor of Warren G. Harding although the wisdom of the bosses was not followed in choosing Calvin Coolidge as his running mate. The Democrats on the other hand took 44 ballots before nominating Governor James M. Cox of Ohio with Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York as his running mate. The Democrats would lose everything except the solid South and garner only 9 million votes to the Republicans 16 million – the fringe candidates would collect nearly 6 percent of the popular vote, enough to swing a non landslide election but not enough to change this one. Interestingly enough it was Woodrow Wilson and his reforms, his war and his bumbling internationalism that lost the election for the Democrats. Harding said almost nothing, Coolidge said even less – as was his wont, and the $500,000 in contributions from the Irish to the Democrats – through the law office of Franklin D. Roosevelt – have never been accounted for.

Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York, arriving at the White House for conference with the president

Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York, arriving at the White House for conference with the president

1920: the year of the six presidents New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2007 David Pietrusza Presidents United States Election 1920 Hardcover. 1st Carroll & Graf ed., later printing. 533 p.: ill.; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 507-522) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Eugene V. Debs, seated at desk would campaign from prison and still garner nearly a million votes

Eugene V. Debs, seated at desk would campaign from prison and still garner nearly a million votes

The presidential election of 1920 was one of the most dramatic ever. For the only time in the nation’s history, six once-and-future presidents hoped to end up in the White House: Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Herbert Hoover, and Theodore Roosevelt. It was an election that saw unprecedented levels of publicity and it was the first to garner extensive newsreel coverage. It was also the first election in which women could vote.

Parley P. Christensen & group, 8/10/20 the farm labor and women's candidate who, since they had been given the vote became a footnote

Parley P. Christensen & group, 8/10/20 the farm labor and women’s candidate who, since they had been given the vote became a footnote

Meanwhile, the 1920 census showed that America had become an urban nation — automobiles, mass production, chain stores, and easy credit were transforming the economy and America was limbering up for the most spectacular decade of its history, the roaring ’20s. Historian David Pietrusza’s new work presents a panorama of presidential personalities, ambitions, plots, and counterplots — a picture of modern America at the crossroads.

Aaron S.Watkins the prohibition candidate who was ignored after the Eighteenth Amendment passed

Aaron S.Watkins the prohibition candidate who was ignored after the Eighteenth Amendment passed

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