Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty… John F. Kennedy


There was a time when these words were something more than either meaningless rhetoric or cynical manipulation. There was a time when Howard Hughes was a man of accomplishment and not a drug addled cripple hiding in a penthouse in the Bahamas. This book recounts a time when the accomplishments of men like Hughes harkened to the call of men like Kennedy and confronted an enemy who had sent silent killers to roam the oceans lying in wait for the chance to rain down fire and death on America. Ironically maybe we spent too much on varmint control and not enough on termite extermination.

Howard Hughes speaking before the Press Club. Washington, D.C., July 21. Howard Hughes, speaking at the National Press Club today, before hundreds of government officials and representatives of foreign governments. Hughes today envisioned a future in aviation when giant flying boats, almost as large as modern ocean liners, will fly the Atlantic under conditions in which the element of luck will play no part, speaking at the luncheon in his honor, he described in detail the type of flying craft and equipment he believes the future will see but which is now nothing more than an aeronautical engineers dream, 7/21/38

Howard Hughes speaking before the Press Club. Washington, D.C., July 21. Howard Hughes, speaking at the National Press Club today, before hundreds of government officials and representatives of foreign governments. Hughes today envisioned a future in aviation when giant flying boats, almost as large as modern ocean liners, will fly the Atlantic under conditions in which the element of luck will play no part, speaking at the luncheon in his honor, he described in detail the type of flying craft and equipment he believes the future will see but which is now nothing more than an aeronautical engineers dream, 7/21/38

The Jennifer Project; with a new preface and postscript. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, c 1997 Clyde W. Burleson Submarine disasters Soviet Union Hardcover. Originally published: New York : Prentice Hall, N.Y., 1977. 1st Texas A&M University Press ed. and printing. ix, 183 p.: ill.; 23 cm. Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

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In 1968 a Soviet G-class submarine mysteriously exploded and sank to the bottom of the Pacific. With Cold War secrecy and speed, U.S. military intelligence raced to find a way to raise the sub. In the new preface to this edition of The Jennifer Project, which was first published in 1977, author Clyde Burleson discusses some of the sources he could not reveal twenty years ago and provides an interesting swords-to-plowshares update.

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In one of the more remarkable episodes of high-tech espionage and engineering of the Cold War, the effort to raise the Soviet sub, code-named the “Jennifer Project,” assembled a cast of players that included top military brass, the CIA, and the eccentric millionaire and inventor Howard Hughes.


The Project was a monumental effort to create a tool that could reach three miles below the ocean’s surface and pull the sub from primordial muck — in secret. Financed and built by Hughes and Global Marine under contract with the CIA, the ship created to pluck the sub from the ooze was a technological marvel. Two football fields in length and twenty-three stories high, the Hughes Glomar Explorer held in its hull a six-million-pound submersible “claw” for picking up sections of the submarine.

Howard Hughes's (and his family's) gravesite at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Texas

Howard Hughes’s (and his family’s) gravesite at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Texas

The project cost the U.S. government hundreds of millions of dollars, but the intelligence community was betting that, if successful, reclamation of the Soviet submarine would mean accessing invaluable military knowledge as the two superpowers neared negotiations in the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty talks. The Jennifer Project revisits a fascinating period of high-level intrigue and invention that has remained unknown to many Americans.

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