Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far… Theodore Roosevelt


This is not THE biography of Theodore Roosevelt – our current favorite is Edmund Morris’ work – but it is a very good short life of TR and very useful as such. When there is no bishop for a particular diocese the condition is referred to as Sede Vecante indicating that the episcopal chair is empty. Since the Oval Office has been effectively empty since January 19, 1989 we find ourselves looking back for acceptable models of leadership and this book might be beneficially used as a precis by any political group seeking to rescue and reinvigorate our nation.

Lion in the White House: a life of Theodore Roosevelt New York: Basic Books, c 2007 Aida D. Donald  Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 Hardcover. xvi, 287 p. : ill.; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-268) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG  

In 1888, Century Magazine published a series of articles about the West written by Roosevelt and illustrated by Remington. In a May article, Roosevelt told the story of his daring capture of three thieves who had stolen a boat from his Elkhorn Ranch. Remington depicted their capture in this painting.

In 1888, Century Magazine published a series of articles about the West written by Roosevelt and illustrated by Remington. In a May article, Roosevelt told the story of his daring capture of three thieves who had stolen a boat from his Elkhorn Ranch. Remington depicted their capture in this painting.

New York State Assemblyman, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, New York City Police Commissioner, Governor of New York, Vice President and, at forty-two, the youngest President ever-in his own words, Theodore Roosevelt “rose like a rocket.” He was also a cowboy, a soldier, a historian, an intrepid explorer, and an unsurpassed environmentalist – all in all, perhaps the most accomplished Chief Executive in our nation’s history.

In Lion in the White House: A Life of Theodore Roosevelt, historian Aida Donald masterfully chronicles the life of this first modern president. TR’s accomplishments in office were immense. As President, Roosevelt redesigned the office of Chief Executive and the workings of the Republican Party to meet the challenges of the new industrial economy.

Theodore Roosevelt emerged from the Spanish-American War a national hero. His military fame now enhanced his reputation as a reform politician in his home state of New York, where he was nominated to run for the governorship that fall of 1898. This cartoon appeared in Judge, October 29, 1898, just prior to Roosevelt's successful election, and predicted his ultimate political destiny, the White House.

Theodore Roosevelt emerged from the Spanish-American War a national hero. His military fame now enhanced his reputation as a reform politician in his home state of New York, where he was nominated to run for the governorship that fall of 1898. This cartoon appeared in Judge, October 29, 1898, just prior to Roosevelt’s successful election, and predicted his ultimate political destiny, the White House.

TR broke trusts to curb the rapacity of big business. He improved economic and social conditions for the average American. Roosevelt built the Panama Canal and engaged the country in world affairs, putting a temporary end to American isolationism. And he won the Nobel Peace Prize – the only sitting president ever so honored for actually brokering a peace treaty.

Throughout his public career, TR fought valiantly to steer the GOP back to its noblest ideals. Alas, his hopes for his party were quashed by the GOP’s strong turn back to the policies supporting business oligarchs in the years after he left office. But his vision for America lives on. In lapidary prose, this concise biography recounts the courageous life of one of the greatest leaders our nation has ever known.

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