It is clear to all that the animal organism is a highly complex system consisting of an almost infinite series of parts connected both with one another and, as a total complex, with the surrounding world, with which it is in a state of equilibrium… Ivan Pavlov


It goes without saying that the desire to accomplish the task with more confidence, to avoid wasting time and labour, and to spare our experimental animals as much as possible, made us strictly observe all the precautions taken by surgeons in respect to their patients.

It goes without saying that the desire to accomplish the task with more confidence, to avoid wasting time and labour, and to spare our experimental animals as much as possible, made us strictly observe all the precautions taken by surgeons in respect to their patients.

Pavlov’s physiology factory : experiment, interpretation, laboratory enterprise  Daniel P. Todes  Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xix, 488 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [469]-480) and indexes. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise.

Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise.

Russian physiologist and Nobel Prize winner Ivan Pavlov is most famous for his development of the concept of the conditional reflex and the classic experiment in which he trained a dog to salivate at the sound of a bell. In Pavlov’s Physiology Factory, Todes explores Pavlov’s early work in digestive physiology through the structures and practices of his landmark laboratory – the physiology department of the Imperial Institute for Experimental Medicine.

Don't become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin.

Don’t become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin.

In Lectures on the Work of the Main Digestive Glands, for which Pavlov won the Nobel Prize in 1904, the scientist frequently referred to the experiments of his coworkers and stated that his conclusions reflected “the deed of the entire laboratory.” This novel claim caused the prize committee some consternation. Was he alone deserving of the prize? Examining the fascinating content of Pavlov’s scientific notes and correspondence, unpublished memoirs, and laboratory publications, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory explores the importance of Pavlov’s directorship of what the author calls a “physiology factory” and illuminates its relationship to Pavlov’s Nobel Prize-winning work and the research on conditional reflexes that followed it.

It is not accidental that all phenomena of human life are dominated by the search for daily bread - the oldest link connecting all living things, man included, with the surrounding nature.

It is not accidental that all phenomena of human life are dominated by the search for daily bread – the oldest link connecting all living things, man included, with the surrounding nature.

Todes looks at Pavlov’s performance in his various roles as laboratory manager, experimentalist, entrepreneur, and scientific visionary. He discusses changes wrought by government and commercial interests in science and sheds light on the pathways of scientific development in Russia – making clear Pavlov’s personal achievements while also examining his style of laboratory management. Pavlov’s Physiology Factory thus addresses issues of importance to historians of science and scientists today: “big” versus “small” science, the dynamics of experiment and interpretation, and the development of research cultures.

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