If you think cryptography is the answer to your problem, then you don’t know what your problem is.


radio001

The searchers : how radio interception changed the course of both world wars  Kenneth Macksey  London : Cassell, 2003  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. 288 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [280]) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

radio002

With the renewed interest in wartime intelligence, a timely history of radio intercepting answers the question of how enemy messages are detected in the first place. The focus is on the early war-shortening Y and Radio Intercept Services, and their brilliantly clever inventors and technologists who proved to be unsung heroes with headphones clamped to their ears. From 1914 to the great campaigns of World War II, radio intercepts shaped the course of history.

radio003

In both world wars, radio was a primary means of communication – and searching for enemy radio traffic became top priority. Using radio intercepts enabled the Germans to inflict devastating losses on the Russians in 1914; mis-using radio intercepts saw the Royal Navy fail to catch the German fleet.

radio004

ENIGMA has popularised the subject of code-breaking and military intelligence as never before. Yet the ULTRA secret – the Allied ‘breaking’ of the German ‘Enigma’ code was only part of a much wider story.Radio warfare played a critical role during the Battle of Britain and the battle of the Atlantic: regardless of what a U-boat transmitted, naval intelligence developed the technology to catch them the moment they began to broadcast and this, more than any other single factor, led to the defeat of the wolf packs.

radio005

Advertisements

Comments Off on If you think cryptography is the answer to your problem, then you don’t know what your problem is.

Filed under Book Reviews

Comments are closed.