There could not have been a lovelier sight; but there was none to see it except a little boy who was staring in at the window. He had ecstasies innumerable that other children can never know; but he was looking through the window at the one joy from which he must be for ever barred… J.M. Barrie


Neverland : J.M. Barrie, the du Mauriers and the dark side of Peter Pan  Piers Dudgeon Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xvi, 333 p., [24] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

An extraordinary book about the imagination – and the astonishing force of its creative power . . . for evil as well as good. Captivated is a true story of genius and possession. The central character is the creator of Peter Pan, the novelist and playwright J.M. Barrie, a man tormented by inner demons since childhood.

Barrie developed a consuming interest in the family of George du Maurier, author of Trilby , a bestselling novel featuring his creation Svengali. Barrie made his move on the du Maurier family immediately after George’s death, assuming George’s mantel. Soon Barrie was “Uncle Jim” to George du Maurier’s eight grandchildren, playing romping games of adventure and make-believe and inviting the children into the transcendental world of Neverland.

Four of the boys (the “lost boys” of Peter Pan ) and one of the girls (the imaginative tomboy Daphne) were captivated. This fascinating book delves deep, makes links and yields up secrets. It tells how Barrie’s victims – whom he would have not grow up – were lost to breakdown, suicide or early death.

Daphne du Maurier, author of Rebecca emerges as the lost boys’ companion and the enigmatic chronicler of their fate. Neverland is about writing and the world of the imagination: it is a singular example of art being used not only to imitate life, but darkly to transform it.

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