Archaeology is the only discipline that seeks to study human behavior and thought without having any direct contact with either.


The archaeologist was a spy : Sylvanus G. Morley and the Office of Naval Intelligence  Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c 2003  Hardcover. 1st ed. xiv, 450 p. : ill., 1 map ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 420-431) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

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Sylvanus G. Morley (1883-1948) has been highly regarded for over a century for his archaeological work among the Maya pyramids. As director of the Carnegie Archaeological Program, he supervised the reconstruction of Chichen Itza, one of today’s most visited sites in Central America.

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Harris and Sadler present information showing Morley used his archaeological skills and contacts to covertly spy for the U. S. Office of Naval Intelligence during World War I. His primary charge was to detect and report German activity along the more than 1200 miles of eastern Central American and Mexican coastlines. To aid him in this special “fieldwork,” Morley recruited other archaeologists, assigned them specific territories in which to work, and, together, they maintained a constant vigil.

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