Few men during their lifetime come anywhere near exhausting the resources dwelling within them. There are deep wells of strength that are never used… Richard E. Byrd


The Arctic Council planning a search for Sir John Franklin

The Arctic Council planning a search for Sir John Franklin

Ninety Degrees North: The Quest for the North Pole  Fergus Fleming  London : Granta Books, 2001  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xxi, 470 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. [454]-458). Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Frobisher was a talented navigator, explorer, who undertook expeditions to Guinea and Greenland, as well as sailing the oceans to plunder foreign ships.

Frobisher was a talented navigator, explorer, who undertook expeditions to Guinea and Greenland, as well as sailing the oceans to plunder foreign ships.

In the mid-19th century, the North Pole was a mystery. Explorers who tried to penetrate the icy wastes failed or died. After Sir John Franklin disappeared with all his men in 1845, serious efforts began to be made to find the true Northernmost point. This is a vivid and witty history of the disasters that ensued.

Ross became an Arctic explorer after distinguished naval service in the Napoleonic Wars. In 1818, he made his first voyage in search of the Northwest Passage to China. Deciding the route was blocked by mountains, Ross's reputation suffered when it was later shown that the mountains were an optical illusion. Ross rebounded by attracting funding, from the gin distiller Felix Booth, to command the first steam ship into the Arctic on another voyage to locate the Northwest Passage (1829-33).

Ross became an Arctic explorer after distinguished naval service in the Napoleonic Wars. In 1818, he made his first voyage in search of the Northwest Passage to China. Deciding the route was blocked by mountains, Ross’s reputation suffered when it was later shown that the mountains were an optical illusion. Ross rebounded by attracting funding, from the gin distiller Felix Booth, to command the first steam ship into the Arctic on another voyage to locate the Northwest Passage (1829-33).

Entered the Navy at the age of thirteen, and served in the North Sea and the Baltic. In 1818, he commanded a brig on an Arctic expedition and the following year he was appointed to command another expedition to search for a North-West Passage to the Pacific. The trip was successful and returned with much scientific material. Parry's care for his men, his solution of many of the problems of wintering in the ice, and his meticulous scientific work set a pattern of Arctic exploration for a generation. He subsequently made several more expeditions to the Arctic, culminating in an attempt on the North Pole from the northern shores of Spitzbergen. The furthest north that he reached stood as a record for nearly fifty years.

Entered the Navy at the age of thirteen, and served in the North Sea and the Baltic. In 1818, he commanded a brig on an Arctic expedition and the following year he was appointed to command another expedition to search for a North-West Passage to the Pacific. The trip was successful and returned with much scientific material. Parry’s care for his men, his solution of many of the problems of wintering in the ice, and his meticulous scientific work set a pattern of Arctic exploration for a generation. He subsequently made several more expeditions to the Arctic, culminating in an attempt on the North Pole from the northern shores of Spitzbergen. The furthest north that he reached stood as a record for nearly fifty years.

Rear-admiral and explorer; discovered the north magnetic pole on an expedition funded by the gin manufacturer Felix Booth, 1831; commanded expedition on the Antarctic, 1839-43, and searched for Sir John Franklin, 1848-9.

Rear-admiral and explorer; discovered the north magnetic pole on an expedition funded by the gin manufacturer Felix Booth, 1831; commanded expedition on the Antarctic, 1839-43, and searched for Sir John Franklin, 1848-9.

Back was a naval officer who helped to trace the Arctic coastline of North America. He twice accompanied the British explorer John Franklin to Canada's Northwest Territories (1819-22 and 1825-7) and later conducted two expeditions of his own to the same region. The first of these expeditions, in 1833, was to search for another British explorer, John Ross, who had disappeared on an Arctic voyage in 1829. The venture resulted in the exploration of the Great Fish River (now the Back River). In 1836 Back returned to explore the coastal region east from the mouth of the river. His writings include Narrative of the Arctic Land Expedition to the Mouth of the Great Fish River (1836).

Back was a naval officer who helped to trace the Arctic coastline of North America. He twice accompanied the British explorer John Franklin to Canada’s Northwest Territories (1819-22 and 1825-7) and later conducted two expeditions of his own to the same region. The first of these expeditions, in 1833, was to search for another British explorer, John Ross, who had disappeared on an Arctic voyage in 1829. The venture resulted in the exploration of the Great Fish River (now the Back River). In 1836 Back returned to explore the coastal region east from the mouth of the river. His writings include Narrative of the Arctic Land Expedition to the Mouth of the Great Fish River (1836).

Arctic explorer; entered the Navy in 1824; made first Arctic voyage, 1836-7; played a prominent part in the expeditions sent out to search for Sir John Franklin, 1850-4; discovered the North-West Passage, 1854, before abandoning his ship; court-martialled, but honourably acquitted; served in China, 1856-61; made Vice-Admiral, 1873.

Arctic explorer; entered the Navy in 1824; made first Arctic voyage, 1836-7; played a prominent part in the expeditions sent out to search for Sir John Franklin, 1850-4; discovered the North-West Passage, 1854, before abandoning his ship; court-martialled, but honourably acquitted; served in China, 1856-61; made Vice-Admiral, 1873.

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