Unlike other dictators, Stalin and his satraps never made the mistake of believing themselves beloved – on the contrary they saw plots under every stone… Anna Reid


Stalin’s secret pogrom : the postwar inquisition of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee  edited and with introductions by Joshua Rubenstein and Vladimire P. Naumov ; translated by Laura Ester Wolfson  New Haven, CT : Yale University Press in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, c 2005  Softcover. Abridged ed. xxvii, 435 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

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In the spring and summer of 1952, fifteen Soviet Jews, including five prominent Yiddish writers and poets, were secretly tried and convicted; multiple executions soon followed in the basement of Moscow’s Lubyanka prison. The defendants were falsely charged with treason and espionage because of their involvement in the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee and because of their heartfelt response as Jews to Nazi atrocities in occupied Soviet territory. Stalin had created the committee to rally support for the Soviet Union during World War II. The committee pursued their mission faithfully, at the same time seeking to publicize the German mass murders that constituted the Holocaust in the East. Stalin disbanded the committee after the war as his paranoia mounted about Soviet Jews.

For many years, a host of myths surrounded the case against the committee. Now this book, which presents an abridged version of the long-suppressed transcript of the trial, reveals the Kremlin’s machinery of destruction. Joshua Rubenstein provides annotations about the players and events surrounding the case. In a long introduction, drawing on newly released documents in Moscow archives and on interviews with relatives of the defendants in Israel, Russia, and the United States, Rubenstein also sets the trial in historical and political context and offers a vivid account of Stalin’s anti-Semitic campaign that closed a significant chapter in the Holocaust continuum.

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