Not though the soldier knew Someone had blundered…


Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Seacole owes her reputation to her nursing activities during the Crimean war. Rebuffed when she tried to join Florence Nightingale's nursing sisters, she travelled independently to Balaklava where she helped open the British Hotel halfway between the harbour and British Headquarters. It served as an officers' club, a canteen for troops and a base for her nursing. She remained in the Crimea until July 1856, returning to England after financial difficulties. She was a familiar figure to British newspaper readers through the reports of William Howard Russell.

Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Seacole owes her reputation to her nursing activities during the Crimean war. Rebuffed when she tried to join Florence Nightingale’s nursing sisters, she travelled independently to Balaklava where she helped open the British Hotel halfway between the harbour and British Headquarters. It served as an officers’ club, a canteen for troops and a base for her nursing. She remained in the Crimea until July 1856, returning to England after financial difficulties. She was a familiar figure to British newspaper readers through the reports of William Howard Russell.

Crimea : the Great Crimean War, 1854-1856  Trevor Royle  London : Little, Brown, 1999  Hardcover. xi, 564 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 25 cm.  Maps on lining papers. Includes bibliographical references and index. The war was a watershed in world history and pointed the way to what mass warfare would be like in the twentieth century. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Sir William John Codrington (1804-1884), General, younger brother to Edward, became a soldier and distinguished himself during the Crimean war at Alma and Inkerman, becoming commander-in-chief at Sebastopol in 1855 and governor of Gibraltar in 1859.

Sir William John Codrington (1804-1884), General, younger brother to Edward, became a soldier and distinguished himself during the Crimean war at Alma and Inkerman, becoming commander-in-chief at Sebastopol in 1855 and governor of Gibraltar in 1859.

George Hamilton Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (1784-1860), Prime Minister. Skilful and conciliatory Foreign Secretary, 1841-6; formed a coalition ministry of Whigs and Peelites, 1852.

George Hamilton Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (1784-1860), Prime Minister. Skilful and conciliatory Foreign Secretary, 1841-6; formed a coalition ministry of Whigs and Peelites, 1852.

Marie Edme Patrice Maurice de Mac-Mahon, Duke of Magenta (1808-1893), Marshal of France

Marie Edme Patrice Maurice de Mac-Mahon, Duke of Magenta (1808-1893), Marshal of France

François Achille Bazaine (1811-1888), French soldier

François Achille Bazaine (1811-1888), French soldier

Aimable Jean Jacques Pélissier, 1st Duc de Malakoff (1794-1864), Marshal of France; The Council of War on the day of the taking of the Mamelon Quarries, 7 June 1855

Aimable Jean Jacques Pélissier, 1st Duc de Malakoff (1794-1864), Marshal of France; The Council of War on the day of the taking of the Mamelon Quarries, 7 June 1855

Nicholas I, Emperor of Russia (1796-1855), Emperor of Russia 1816-55

Nicholas I, Emperor of Russia (1796-1855), Emperor of Russia 1816-55

Alexander II, Emperor of Russia (1818-1881), Reigned 1855-1881

Alexander II, Emperor of Russia (1818-1881), Reigned 1855-1881

Sir William Howard Russell (1820-1907), Journalist. The events of the Crimean War were reported home with unprecedented speed and vividness. Russell's letters to the Times, especially his outraged accounts of the sufferings of the troops in the winter of 1854-5 and alerted the public to the true condition of the army.

Sir William Howard Russell (1820-1907), Journalist. The events of the Crimean War were reported home with unprecedented speed and vividness. Russell’s letters to the Times, especially his outraged accounts of the sufferings of the troops in the winter of 1854-5 and alerted the public to the true condition of the army.

Advertisements

Comments Off on Not though the soldier knew Someone had blundered…

Filed under Pictorial Essays

Comments are closed.