. . . the Armenian massacre was the greatest crime of the war, and the failure to act against Turkey is to condone it . . . the failure to deal radically with the Turkish horror means that all talk of guaranteeing the future peace of the world is mischievous nonsense… Theodore Roosevelt, May 11, 1918, letter to Cleveland Hoadley Dodge


And all those dead of Belgium and all that mighty procession of the slain in Armenia--how if all these hosts still live? German military officer astride artillery in a cemetery waving off a ghostly army.

And all those dead of Belgium and all that mighty procession of the slain in Armenia–how if all these hosts still live? German military officer astride artillery in a cemetery waving off a ghostly army.

The burning Tigris : the Armenian genocide and America’s response  Peter Balakian  New York : HarperCollins, c 2003  Hardcover. 1st ed., later printing. xx, 475 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [441]-453) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

The Turks' bag of game This picture shows that the Turks, in the remote districts of Aisa Monor [i.e. Asia Minor] beyond the reach of the protecting hand of the Allies, have continued their policy of the slaughter of the Armenian Christians after the signing of the armistice. The massacre of the forty shown in the picture, which has just been received in this country, occurred in February 1919.

The Turks’ bag of game This picture shows that the Turks, in the remote districts of Aisa Monor [i.e. Asia Minor] beyond the reach of the protecting hand of the Allies, have continued their policy of the slaughter of the Armenian Christians after the signing of the armistice. The massacre of the forty shown in the picture, which has just been received in this country, occurred in February 1919.


In this history of the Armenian Genocide, the author brings us a narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and  first-person accounts, Peter Balakian presents the history of how the Young Turk government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he also resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history.

Give or we perish American Committee for Relief in the Near East--Armenia-Greece-Syria-Persia--Campaign for $30,000,000

Give or we perish American Committee for Relief in the Near East–Armenia-Greece-Syria-Persia–Campaign for $30,000,000

During the United States’ ascension in the global arena at the turn of the twentieth century, America’s humanitarian movement for Armenia was an important part of the rising nation’s first epoch of internationalism. Intellectuals, politicians, diplomats, religious leaders, and ordinary citizens came together to try to save the Armenians.

Lest they perish Campaign for $30,000,000 - American Committee for Relief in the Near East--Armenia-Greece-Syria-Persia

Lest they perish Campaign for $30,000,000 – American Committee for Relief in the Near East–Armenia-Greece-Syria-Persia

The Burning Tigris reconstructs this landmark American cause that was spearheaded by the passionate commitments and commentaries of a remarkable cast of public figures, including Julia Ward Howe, Clara Barton, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ambassador Henry Morgenthau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Stone Blackwell, Stephen Crane, and Ezra Pound, as well as courageous missionaries, diplomats, and relief workers who recorded their eyewitness accounts and often risked their lives in the killing fields of Armenia.

Lest we perish Campaign for $30,000,000 ; American Committee for Relief in the Near East ; Armenia - Greece - Syria - Persia ; One Madison Ave., New York, Cleveland H. Dodge, Treasurer.

Lest we perish Campaign for $30,000,000 ; American Committee for Relief in the Near East ; Armenia – Greece – Syria – Persia ; One Madison Ave., New York, Cleveland H. Dodge, Treasurer.

The crisis of the “starving Armenians” was so embedded in American popular culture that, in an age when a loaf of bread cost a nickel, the American people sent more than $100 million in aid through the American Committee on Armenian Atrocities and its successor, Near East Relief. In 1915 alone, the New York Times published 145 articles about the Armenian Genocide.

"The child at your door" 400,000 orphans starving, no state aid available--Campaign for $30,000,000.

“The child at your door” 400,000 orphans starving, no state aid available–Campaign for $30,000,000.

Theodore Roosevelt called the extermination of the Armenians “the greatest crime of the war.” But in the turmoil following World War I, it was a crime that went largely unpunished. In depicting the 1919 Ottoman court-martial trials, Balakian reveals the perpetrators of the Armenian Genocide confessing their guilt – an astonishing fact given the Turkish government’s continued denial of the Genocide.

Syria - Aleppo - Armenian woman kneeling beside dead child in field "within sight of help and safety at Aleppo"

Syria – Aleppo – Armenian woman kneeling beside dead child in field “within sight of help and safety at Aleppo”

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