It is alarming to see Mr. Gandhi, a seditious middle temple lawyer, now posing as a fakir of a type well known in the east, striding half-naked up the steps of the viceregal palace, while he is still organizing and conducting a defiant campaign of civil disobedience, to parley on equal terms with the representative of the king-emperor… Winston Churchill, 1930


Churchill’s empire : the world that made him and the world he made  Richard Toye  New York : Henry Holt and Co., c 2010  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xx, 423 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical reference (p. [317]-407) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

A vivid account of the rise, and fall, of the British Empire during the life of Winston Churchill. Churchill’s image is as an imperial die-hard who was opposed to colonial freedom. However, his relationship to the Empire is far more complex and ambiguous.

This is the first book to provide a comprehensive account of Churchill’s lifelong involvement with the empire, from the early stages of his childhood that shaped his imperialist outlook to his emergence as a self-made hero. Toye presents Churchill as a human being, a man whose imperialist outlook brought both acclaim and dread.

Churchill was a leader who believed in the strength of his race, but not necessarily the human race — he stood alone against Hitler, but he also equated Gandhi with Hitler and believed India would always remain unsuited to democracy.

Drawing upon a wealth of published and unpublished evidence from private diaries to African war poetry Churchill’s Empire provides a vivid and dynamic account of a remarkable man and an extraordinary era.

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