Full Victory – Nothing Else… Dwight David Eisenhower


Photo shows General Eisenhower talking with American paratroopers on the evening of June 5, 1944, as they prepared for the Battle of Normandy. The men are part of Company E, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, at the 101st Airborne Division's camp in Greenham Common, England. Photo includes Sgt. Russell Wilmarth, behind Eisenhower's chin (Source: Alan Offen, 2009); Lt. Wallace C. Strobel with a "23" tag (Source: "Dwight David Eisenhower: The Centennial, CMH Pub 71-40); Ralph "Bud" Thomas, to the left of Strobel (Source: Eileen Thomas Hayes, 2012); and probably Corporal Donald E. Kruger, in front row, far right, wearing a musette bag on his chest

Photo shows General Eisenhower talking with American paratroopers on the evening of June 5, 1944, as they prepared for the Battle of Normandy. The men are part of Company E, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, at the 101st Airborne Division’s camp in Greenham Common, England. Photo includes Sgt. Russell Wilmarth, behind Eisenhower’s chin   Lt. Wallace C. Strobel with a “23” tag ; Ralph “Bud” Thomas, to the left of Strobel (Source: Eileen Thomas Hayes, 2012); and probably Corporal Donald E. Kruger, in front row, far right, wearing a musette bag on his chest

The Normandy Campaign : from D-Day to the liberation of Paris  Victor Brooks  Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, 2002  Hardcover. 1st Da Capo Press ed. 288 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.  Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

brooks003

Many Americans have only a dim appreciation of the fact that the Second World War was conducted on two fronts – each half a world away – and that while the United States certainly did the heavy lifting, from being first the arsenal of democracy to later being the combat presence that shifted the balance to an allied victory in the European theatre of operations it had almost sole responsibility for all aspects of the Pacific theatre of operations. Brooks has given us two books that together give us a panorama of what was, if not the beginning of the end, at least the end of the beginning of the two ocean war that left the United States the only true global superpower in 1945.

brooks004

Hell is upon us : D-Day in the Pacific– Saipan to Guam, June-August 1944  Victor Brooks  Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, 2005  Hardcover. First edition and printing. x, 354 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG      

brooks007

On June 14th 1944, just nine days after the D-Day invasion of Normandy, another mighty fleet steamed towards its own D-Day landing. A huge US flotilla of 800 ships carrying 162,000 men was about to attempt to smash into the outer defenses of the Japanese Empire. Their target was the Marianas Island group, which included Saipan, home to an important Japanese base and a large population of Japanese civilians, and Guam, the first American territory captured in the aftermath of Pearl Harbour.

Boeing B-29

During the next eight weeks, tens of thousands of men, hundreds of planes and dozens of major warships were locked in mortal combat. When it was over, 60,000 Japanese ground troops and most of the carrier air power of the Imperial Navy were annihilated, Japan’s leader, Tojo, was thrown out of office in disgrace and the newly captured enemy airfields were being transformed into launching bases for the B-29s that would carry the conventional and, later, atomic bombs to Japan, turning the land of the Rising Sun into a charred cinder. After the US victory in the Marianas campaign, the road to Tokyo was clearly in sight.

brooks006

 

Advertisements

Comments Off on Full Victory – Nothing Else… Dwight David Eisenhower

Filed under Book Reviews

Comments are closed.