Brass shines as fair to the ignorant as gold to the goldsmiths… Elizabeth I


Elizabeth : the struggle for the throne David Starkey New York : HarperCollins Publishers, c 2001 Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xii, 363 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [325]-351) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

An abused child, yet, a woman in a man’s world, passionately sexual Elizabeth I is often claimed to be England’s most successful ruler. Starkey’s new biography concentrates on Elizabeth’s formative years — from her birth in 1533 to her accession in 1558 — and shows how the experiences formed her character and shaped her opinions and beliefs.

From princess and heir-apparent to bastardized and disinherited royal, accused traitor to head of the princely household, Elizabeth experienced every vicissitude of fortune and extreme of condition — conniving to rise above it, always manipulated by the men waiting just off stage, to reign during a watershed moment in history. A uniquely absorbing tale of one young woman’s turbulent and seemingly impossible journey toward the throne, Elizabeth is the story of the making of a queen who symbolized England even if she did not truly rule.

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