Two titles from the Earle of Caribbean Piracy


The sack of Panama : Captain Morgan and the battle for the Caribbean Peter Earle New York : Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2007 Hardcover. 1st U.S. ed. and printing. x, 292 p. : maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-260) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Captain Henry Morgan’s capture of the city of Panamá in 1671 is seen as one of the most audacious military operations in history. In The Sack of Panamá , Peter Earle masterfully retells this classic story, combining thorough research with an emphasis on the battles that made Morgan a pirate legend.

earle004

Morgan’s raid was the last in a series of brutal attacks on Spanish possesions in the Caribbean, all sanctioned by the British crown. Earle recounts the five violent years leading up to the raid, then delivers a detailed account of Morgan’s march across enemy territory, as his soldiers contended with hunger, tropical diseases, and possible ambushes from locals. He brings a unique dimension to the story by devoting nearly as much space to the Spanish victims as to the Jamican privateers who were the aggressors.

earle005

The book covers not only the scandalous events in the Colonial West Indies, but also the alarmed reacions of diplomats and statesmen in Madrid and London. While Morgan and his men were laying siege to Panamá , the simmering hostilities between the two nations resulted in vicious political infighting that rivaled the military battles in intensity.
With a wealth of colorful characters and international intrigue, The Sack of Panamá is a painstaking history that doubles as a rip-roaring adventure tale.

earle006

Treasure hunt : shipwreck, diving, and the quest for treasure in an age of heroes Peter Earle New York : Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2008 Hardcover. Originally published: London : Methuen, 2007. 1st U.S. ed. and printing. xv, 383 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [359]-370) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

earle003

Treasure Hunt is the story of an obsession. Rumors of Spanish treasure, or gold and silver at the bottom of the sea, have been a part of maritime lore for centuries. In 1687, Captain William Phips brought back to port an incredible cargo – nearly forty tons of silver and gold – the treasure of the Spanish galleon Concepción, wrecked over forty years before on a coral reef in the middle of the ocean. The unimaginable had become real, and the great treasure-hunting boom had begun.

earle007

Soon after Phips’s success, there were numerous expeditions that meant to emulate his stunning achievement. During that same time there was also a boom in the invention of crude and often very dangerous diving equipment. Many of these new projects were promoted on the infant stock market, where gambling and treasure hunting became closely connected with the birth of modern capitalism.

earle008

By the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, treasure hunting had become a professional occupation, with a new breed of diver emerging. Much of their time was spent salvaging the wrecks of English and Dutch East-Indiamen carrying treasure to finance business in Asia. Ever since, men have been prepared to risk life and fortune in the search for underwater riches.

Advertisements

Comments Off on Two titles from the Earle of Caribbean Piracy

Filed under Book Reviews

Comments are closed.