Show respect to all people, but grovel to none… Tecumseh


The Indian chief as tragic hero : native resistance and the literatures of America, from Moctezuma to Tecumseh Gordon M. Sayre Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c 2005 Softcover. x, 357 p. : ill., geneal. tables ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [319]-341) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG

King (Metacomet) Philip, Sachem of the Wampanoags, d. 1676, full length, standing at treaty table with white men

King (Metacomet) Philip, Sachem of the Wampanoags, d. 1676, full length, standing at treaty table with white men

The leaders of anticolonial wars of resistance – Metacom, Pontiac, Tecumseh, and Cuauhtemoc – spread fear across the frontiers of North America. Yet once defeated, these men became iconic martyrs for postcolonial national identity in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. By the early 1800s a craze arose for Indian tragedy on the U.S. stage, such as John Augustus Stone’s Metamora, and for Indian biographies as national historiography, such as the writings of Benjamin Drake, Francis Parkman, and William Apess.

William Campbell and Indians by a fire; possibly related to Pontiac's Conspiracy.

William Campbell and Indians by a fire; possibly related to Pontiac’s Conspiracy.

With chapters on seven major resistance struggles, including the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the Natchez Massacre of 1729, The Indian Chief as Tragic Hero offers an analysis of not only the tragedies and epics written about these leaders, but also their own speeches and strategies, as recorded in archival sources and narratives by adversaries including Hernán Cortés, Antoine-Simon Le Page du Pratz, Joseph Doddridge, Robert Rogers, and William Henry Harrison.

Print shows Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, and Tecumseh, with other Natives and tipis in the background.

Print shows Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, and Tecumseh, with other Natives and tipis in the background.

Sayre concludes that these tragedies and epics about Native resistance laid the foundation for revolutionary culture and historiography in the three modern nations of North America, and that, at odds with the trope of the complaisant “vanishing Indian,” these leaders presented colonizers with a cathartic reproof of past injustices.

Statue of Cuitlahuac [i.e. Cuauhtemoc] Paseo de la Reforma.

Statue of Cuitlahuac [i.e. Cuauhtemoc] Paseo de la Reforma.

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