Tag Archives: Erwin Rommel

The truth not only had a bodyguard of lies it was also well camouflaged.

Production. A-31 ("Vengeance") dive bombers. Camouflaging the ship. A Vultee "Vengeance" dive bomber manufactured at Vultee's Nashville Division is shown attached to the overhead mechanized assembly line trolly. The dive bomber has just entered the huge paint spray booth where it is receiving its camouflage painting treatment before moving to the next station. The "Vengeance" (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the RAF (Royal Air Force) and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

Production. A-31 (“Vengeance”) dive bombers. Camouflaging the ship. A Vultee “Vengeance” dive bomber manufactured at Vultee’s Nashville Division is shown attached to the overhead mechanized assembly line trolly. The dive bomber has just entered the huge paint spray booth where it is receiving its camouflage painting treatment before moving to the next station. The “Vengeance” (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the RAF (Royal Air Force) and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

Contrary to popular opinion and the recent historical record the British invented neither cunning nor deception. While this book covers many of their better publicized efforts we have illustrated the entry with photographs of the largely American efforts during the two world wars – it was, after all, the Americans who won both wars after Britain’s mismanagement and near collapse.

New York, New York. Architect taking a night course in camouflage at New York University in order to find a good spot for his talents in the United States Army or in industry. The class is taught by having the students make models from photographs, camouflage them and rephotograph them

New York, New York. Architect taking a night course in camouflage at New York University in order to find a good spot for his talents in the United States Army or in industry. The class is taught by having the students make models from photographs, camouflage them and rephotograph them

A genius for deception : how cunning helped the British win two world wars  Nicholas Rankin  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009  Hardcover. First published in Great Britain as Churchill’s wizards : the British genius for deception, 1914-1945 in 2008 by Faber and Faber. 1st US ed., later printing. xiv, 466 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Seven images taken on November 12, 1918 at the American camouflage factory at Dijon, France. Images show Col. Brenner, the commander of camouflage work in the American Army, with a "dummy" soldier; stone and grass costumes for snipers, paper mache soldiers, a soldier holding a picture of a soldier's face on a stick, Col. Brenner and officers, and a hangar for large sheets used to cover airdromes.

Seven images taken on November 12, 1918 at the American camouflage factory at Dijon, France. Images show Col. Brenner, the commander of camouflage work in the American Army, with a “dummy” soldier; stone and grass costumes for snipers, paper mache soldiers, a soldier holding a picture of a soldier’s face on a stick, Col. Brenner and officers, and a hangar for large sheets used to cover airdromes.

In February 1942, intelligence officer Victor Jones erected 150 tents behind British lines in North Africa. “Hiding tanks in Bedouin tents was an old British trick,” writes Nicholas Rankin. German general Erwin Rommel not only knew of the ploy, but had copied it himself.  Jones knew that Rommel knew.  In fact, he counted on it – for these tents were empty. With the deception that he was carrying out a deception, Jones made a weak point look like a trap.

Camouflaged German gun position, beach in Quinéville Sketch showing house with missing roof with gun in doorway in Quinéville, Manche, France.

Camouflaged German gun position, beach in Quinéville Sketch showing house with missing roof with gun in doorway in Quinéville, Manche, France.

In A Genius for Deception, Nicholas Rankin offers a lively and comprehensive history of how Britain bluffed, tricked, and spied its way to victory in two world wars. As Rankin shows, a coherent program of strategic deception emerged in World War I, resting on the pillars of camouflage, propaganda, secret intelligence, and special forces. All forms of deception found an avid sponsor in Winston Churchill, who carried his enthusiasm for deceiving the enemy into World War II.

Private William Madison emerging from a foxhole concealed by a papier mache rock during a camouflage demonstration

Private William Madison emerging from a foxhole concealed by a papier mache rock during a camouflage demonstration

Rankin vividly recounts such little-known episodes as the invention of camouflage by two French artist-soldiers, the creation of dummy airfields for the Germans to bomb during the Blitz, and the fabrication of an army that would supposedly invade Greece. Strategic deception would be key to a number of WWII battles, culminating in the massive misdirection that proved critical to the success of the D-Day invasion in 1944.

Men on jungle patrol in the Caribbean area take fullest advantage of natural foliage for camouflage purposes. It takes a quick eye to see these men stealing through the jungles

Men on jungle patrol in the Caribbean area take fullest advantage of natural foliage for camouflage purposes. It takes a quick eye to see these men stealing through the jungles

Advertisements

Comments Off on The truth not only had a bodyguard of lies it was also well camouflaged.

Filed under Book Reviews

Nobody ever defended anything successfully, there is only attack and attack and attack some more… George S. Patton

Hugh Tenant Weedon Mercer, head-and-shoulders portrait, right profile

Hugh Tenant Weedon Mercer, head-and-shoulders portrait, right profile

Patton and Rommel: men of war in the twentieth century New York: Berkley Caliber, c 2005 Dennis Showalter Generals, Biography, Patton, George S. (George Smith), 1885-1945, Rommel, Erwin, 1891-1944 Hardcover. 441 p.; 24 cm. Includes index. A dual biography of the two World War II generals who changed warfare – and history – forever. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

A dual biography of the two World War II generals who changed warfare – and history – forever.

General George S. Patton and General Erwin Rommel: They served their countries through two World Wars. Their temperaments, both on and off the battlefield, were overwhelmingly contrary – but their approach to modern warfare was remarkably similar.

Hugh Weedon Mercer, 1808-1877. Half length, facing left. CSA general.

Hugh Weedon Mercer, 1808-1877. Half length, facing left. CSA general.

Showalter’s volume is the first parallel biography of these men. His comparative approach does not simply cast them in a new light, but also their respective military institutions and cultures as well as methods of warfare. This fresh line of attack, while not adding significantly to what we already know about the men individually, enables the author to demonstrate the similarities and differences that made both admirable leaders and respected foes. Interestingly, Showalter makes the case that both soldiers, so far as military prowess is concerned, were more revered from across the Atlantic than in their home countries.

Rommel, while viewed as the archetypal “good German” in the Federal Republic because of his ambiguous links to the July 20, 1944, attempt on Hitler’s life, is given even higher praise by Americans for his operational genius and masterful improvisation on the battlefield. He has even become an iconic figure at West Point, where cadets are more likely to do term papers and research projects on him than anyone except Robert E. Lee. German scholars are usually more critical. They focus on Rommel’s unwillingness to accept blame for losses and argue that his tactical blunders often weakened overall strategy.

rommel004

Patton’s legacy is similar. Though he was a respected war hero among most Americans, Patton’s inability to suffer fools has given him an uneasy place in American historical memory that so cherishes first-rate second-rate men and their lessers – especially that written from the rear echelon. German professionals, however, extol Patton for his aggressive style of warfare and ability to command the battlefield. “Had he been given a free hand by your Eisenhowers and Bradleys,” one commentator mused, “Shermans would have been rolling down Unter den Linden before the Russians ever saw the Oder”.

The seven thematic chapters trace the lives of both men from their childhood, climbing through the ranks in the Great War, to the ends of their careers. Differences seem to outstrip similarities. Descended from Hugh Weedon Mercer, who had been killed in the Battle of Princeton during the American Revolution and whose grandson had been a Confederate general during the War for Southern Independence, his paternal grandfather was George Smith Patton who commanded the 22nd Virginia Infantry  and was killed in the Third Battle of Winchester, while his great-uncle Waller Tazewell Patton was killed in Pickett’s Charge during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Patton, of southern aristocratic stock with a long pedigree of Confederate warriors behind him, was a cavalryman whose career might be described best as “a prince asserting his heritage”. He  made his way through Virginia Military Institute and  West Point and served on Pershing’s staff chasing Pancho Villa. During World War One, he served in the U.S. Army Tank Corps in France and was wounded in battle. The interwar years were a time of preparation to advance his aspirations of military distinction. World War Two provided an opportunity, which Patton seized, and his successes in North Africa, the Italian campaign, Normandy, the Bulge and the invasion of Germany were proofs of his command abilities.

Major General George S. Patton, Jr., Commander of U.S. Forces in French Morocco, compares notes at Camp Anfa, near Casablanca, with Vice Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten of Great Britain

Major General George S. Patton, Jr., Commander of U.S. Forces in French Morocco, compares notes at Camp Anfa, near Casablanca, with Vice Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten of Great Britain

Rommel, by contrast, was the son of a secondary schoolmaster in Württemberg. A middle-class Swabian at a time when Prussian nobility dominated the German army’s commissioned appointments. Rommel did not enter the military because of patriotism or heritage like Patton; rather, his father influenced his decision as the military offered a solid career to the practically minded young man. He went from being a cadet in the 124th Infantry Regiment in 1910, to the War School in Danzig, becoming a platoon commander in 1914. By 1915, Rommel was making a name for himself in the elite Württemberg Mountain Battalion with a series of impressive victories against the Romanians and Italians. Peacetime was especially disconcerting for Rommel as the reduction of the German army under the Versailles Treaty threatened the only way of life he knew. His credentials, however, eventually landed him a permanent Reichswehr position as commander of a rifle company in the 13th Regiment, 5th Division. The Second World War also afforded the workaday warrior the prospect of military distinction, something he relished, but never obsessively sought. Whereas Patton had access to the materiel of the world’s industrial and military superpower, Rommel fought his war with limited resources, even making use of plundered tanks.

Casablanca conference at Casablanca, Morocco, President Roosevelt with Major General George S. Patton, Jr., affixing the Congressional Medal of Honor upon Brig. General William H. Wilbur in the presence of General George C. Marshall

Casablanca conference at Casablanca, Morocco, President Roosevelt with Major General George S. Patton, Jr., affixing the Congressional Medal of Honor upon Brig. General William H. Wilbur in the presence of General George C. Marshall

While many differences may have separated these two tank riders, Showalter homes in on an important characteristic that they shared, namely a “situational awareness” that steered much of their lives and careers. This “situational awareness” was instinctual, a gut feeling that allowed Patton and Rommel, usually, to make the right decisions on the battlefield.

Written by a prominent military historian, Patton and Rommel takes a provocative look at both figures, intertwining the stories of the paths they took and the decisions they made during the course of the Second World War – and compares the lives and careers of two men whose military tactics redirected the course of history.

Comments Off on Nobody ever defended anything successfully, there is only attack and attack and attack some more… George S. Patton

Filed under Book Reviews

There is a silence where hath been no sound, There is a silence where no sound may be,— in the wide desert where no life is found.

The desert war George Forty World War 1939-1945 Campaigns Africa North Stroud : Sutton, 2002 Hardcover. 1st. ed. vii, 256 p. : ill. (some col.), maps, ports. ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.  Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.   VG/VG

In the summer of 1940, hoping to emulate Hitler in Western Europe, Mussolini aimed to conquer North Africa, only to be routed by far smaller British and Commonwealth forces that drove out the invaders and captured the entire Italian Tenth Army. This defeat led Hitler to send the Deutsches Afrika Korps, commanded by Rommel, to bolster the Axis forces in Africa.

From April 1941, the ‘Desert Fox’ and his Allied opponents fought many bitter battles across the inhospitable deserts of North Africa, the fighting raging back and forth as first one side and then the other gained control. The battle of Alam Halfa in July 1942 saw Rommel thwarted just outside Cairo and the Suez Canal. The battle of El Alamein in October that year was the turning point in North Africa, with Rommel being forced into a long and stubborn withdrawal towards Tunisia. The Germans were forced to fight on two fronts after the Allied ‘Torch’ landings in French North Africa, and were finally defeated in May 1943.

In this new book, well-known military writer George Forty tells the story of these turbulent campaigns through the camera lens, in a series of evocative photographs illustrating every aspect of the Desert War, supported by clear, concise text.

Comments Off on There is a silence where hath been no sound, There is a silence where no sound may be,— in the wide desert where no life is found.

Filed under Book Reviews