Tag Archives: History

There is a saying, if any stranger enquire of the first met of Maan, were it even a child, “Who is here the sheykh?” he would answer him “I am he.” ― Charles M. Doughty, Travels in Arabia Deserta, Volume 1

In search of nomads : an Anglo-American obsession from Hester Stanhope to Bruce Chatwin  John Ure  New York : Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2003  Hardcover. Originally published: London : Constable, 2003. 1st Carroll & Graf ed. xvi, 232 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-225) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

For centuries, settled peoples have contemplated nomads with fascination and envy, or with disdain and fear. Both Americans and the British have had an obsession with nomadic peoples, stemming from their own wanderlust and admiration for the unfettered life.

In Search of Nomads centers on four regions that are rich in nomadic culture — the Arabian peninsula with its Bedouin, the Sahara with its Moors and Tuareg, the mountain ranges of southern Iran with its migratory pastoral tribes, and the steppes of Central Asia with its Mongol horsemen and Tartar descendants.

Author John Ure has traveled with all of these peoples and provides a brief account of the special characteristics and history of each group. However, one of the most appealing aspects of the book is the insight it provides into the often eccentric British and American observers who chose to seek out and travel with nomads.

Some were exiles from nineteenth-century high society, some were footloose adventurers like T. E. Lawrence; some were distinguished literary figures like Vita Sackville-West; while others were notable scholars like Gertrude Bell. In short, the visitors were often odder than the exotic peoples they visited, and John Ure brings both to life with skill and humor.

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Comments Off on There is a saying, if any stranger enquire of the first met of Maan, were it even a child, “Who is here the sheykh?” he would answer him “I am he.” ― Charles M. Doughty, Travels in Arabia Deserta, Volume 1

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Out of monuments, names, words, proverbs, traditions, private records and evidences, fragments of stories, passages of books, and the like, we do save and recover somewhat from the deluge of time… Francis Bacon

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Palladio’s Rome : a translation of Andrea  Palladio’s two guidebooks to Rome  Andrea Palladio  by Vaughan Hart and Peter Hicks  New Haven : Yale  University Press, c 2006  Softcover. lxiii, 285 p.  : ill., maps ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical  references (p. [264]-274) and index. Clean, tight  and strong binding. No highlighting, underlining or  marginalia in text. VG

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Andrea Palladio (1508­–1580), one of the most famous architects of all time, published two enormously popular guides to the churches and antiquities of Rome in 1554. Striving to be both scholarly and popular, Palladio invited his Renaissance readers to discover the charm of Rome’s ancient and medieval wonders, and to follow pilgrimage routes leading from one church to the next. He also described ancient Roman rituals of birth, marriage, and death. Here translated into English and joined in a single volume for the first time, Palladio’s guidebooks allow modern visitors to enjoy Rome exactly as their predecessors did 450 years ago.

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Like the originals, this new edition is pocket-sized and therefore easily read on site. Enhanced with illustrations and commentary, the book also includes the first full English translation of Raphael’s famous letter to Pope Leo X on the monuments of ancient Rome. For architectural historians, tourists, and armchair travelers, this book offers fresh and surprising insights into the antiquarian and ecclesiastical preoccupations of one of the greatest of the Renaissance architectural masters.

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Comments Off on Out of monuments, names, words, proverbs, traditions, private records and evidences, fragments of stories, passages of books, and the like, we do save and recover somewhat from the deluge of time… Francis Bacon

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Unhappy spirits that fell with Lucifer, Conspired against our God with Lucifer, And are for ever damned with Lucifer… Christopher Marlowe

Faustus : the life and times of a renaissance magician  Leo Ruickbie  Stroud, UK : History Press, 2009  Hardcover. 1st ed. 256 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-250) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Five hundred years ago the legend was born of a man who sold his soul to the Devil for power, wealth and women. It is a legend that has inspired genius and still inspires high art and popular culture alike. Around the world there are hundreds of nightly performances of Goethe’s Faust, as well as actual attempts at soul-selling on eBay. Faustus has rightly been described as an ‘icon of modern culture.’ But in 500 years no one has written his biography – until now.

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Faustus is the real story behind the legend. It is the story of a sixteenth-century scandal, of a man who claimed mastery of the forbidden magical arts and dared to rival the miracles attributed to Jesus. He evoked uproar and was accused of heinous crimes. But Faustus was not a charlatan; nor was he in league with the Devil. To find the real Faustus is to find the true history of his age, and Ruickbe expertly takes the reader on a tour of war-torn Italy, Reformation Wittenberg and the magnificence of Charles V’s court. The life of the legend becomes as real as any living person.

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Exuberant over his success despite British skepticism, Stillwell wrote in his diary, “WILL THIS BURN UP THE LIMEYS!

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Building for victory : World War II in China, Burma, and India and the 1875th Engineer Aviation Battalion  William Collins King  Lanham, Md. : Taylor Trade Pub., 2004  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xviii, 219 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-196). Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Lt. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell inspecting Chinese troops in India He is accompanied on his right by General Sun Li Zen and Lo. The former is the commanding general and the latter deputy chief of staff of the Chinese expeditionary forces.

Lt. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell inspecting Chinese troops in India He is accompanied on his right by General Sun Li Zen and Lo. The former is the commanding general and the latter deputy chief of staff of the Chinese expeditionary forces.

Joe E. Brown driving jeep loaded with American G.I.'s seeing the sights of China

Joe E. Brown driving jeep loaded with American G.I.’s seeing the sights of China

Agra (vicinity), India. The curiosity is mutual as American Sergeants Robert L. Snyder and LeRoy R. Bergin and the natives look each other over during a day of sightseeing at the Taj Mahal

Agra (vicinity), India. The curiosity is mutual as American Sergeants Robert L. Snyder and LeRoy R. Bergin and the natives look each other over during a day of sightseeing at the Taj Mahal

Allied military conference in India. American and British military leaders who met in conference recently in India. Left to right: Field Marshal Sir Archibald Wavell; Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stilwell, commanding all U.S. Army troops in China, Burma and India; Lieutenant General H.H. Arnold commanding the entire U.S. Army Forces; Lieutenant General Brehon Somervell, commanding the entire Service of Supply for the U.S. Army; and Field Marshal Sir John Dill

Allied military conference in India. American and British military leaders who met in conference recently in India. Left to right: Field Marshal Sir Archibald Wavell; Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stilwell, commanding all U.S. Army troops in China, Burma and India; Lieutenant General H.H. Arnold commanding the entire U.S. Army Forces; Lieutenant General Brehon Somervell, commanding the entire Service of Supply for the U.S. Army; and Field Marshal Sir John Dill

United States "lend-lease" program in eastern India. A mixed crew of English, Chinese and Indian workmen repair a lend-lease Hudson bomber which was shot up and damaged too badly for field repairs during a bombing raid on the Japanese occupied portion of Akyab, an island off the coast of Burma. The crew named the bomber "Lulu"

United States “lend-lease” program in eastern India. A mixed crew of English, Chinese and Indian workmen repair a lend-lease Hudson bomber which was shot up and damaged too badly for field repairs during a bombing raid on the Japanese occupied portion of Akyab, an island off the coast of Burma. The crew named the bomber “Lulu”

"Flying the Hump, Moonlight, CBI" by Tom Lea. Pilots flying this treacherous route kept Allied supply lines open. (Army Art Collection)

“Flying the Hump, Moonlight, CBI” by Tom Lea. Pilots flying
this treacherous route kept Allied supply lines open. (Army Art Collection)

Army bulldozers constructing the Ledo Road cut a path through a hillside in the Indian jungle. (Department of the Army photograph)

Army bulldozers constructing the Ledo Road cut a path through
a hillside in the Indian jungle. (Department of the Army photograph)

Brig Gen. Frank D. Merrill (far left) watches troops cross into Burma on the Ledo Road. (Department of the Army photograph)

Brig Gen. Frank D. Merrill (far left) watches troops cross
into Burma on the Ledo Road. (Department of the Army photograph)

Marauders rest during a break along a jungle trail near Nhpum Ga.(Department of the Army photograph)

Marauders rest during a break along a jungle
trail near Nhpum Ga.(Department of the Army photograph)

A 75-mm. pack howitzer supports GALAHAD's siege operations at Myitkyina. (Department of the Army photograph)

A 75-mm. pack howitzer supports GALAHAD’s siege operations at
Myitkyina. (Department of the Army photograph)

Aerial view of the first convoy to go from India to China over the re- opened Burma Road. (Department of the Army photograph)

Aerial view of the first convoy to go from India to China over the re-
opened Burma Road. (Department of the Army photograph)

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Filed under Pictorial Essays

“Yes. My great-grandfather, eldest son of the Duke of Bilgewater, fled to this country about the end of the last century, to breathe the pure air of freedom; married here, and died, leaving a son, his own father dying about the same time. The second son of the late duke seized the titles and estates — the infant real duke was ignored. I am the lineal descendant of that infant — I am the rightful Duke of Bridgewater; and here am I, forlorn, torn from my high estate, hunted of men, despised by the cold world, ragged, worn, heart-broken, and degraded to the companionship of felons on a raft!” Mark Twain

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The disappearing duke : the improbable tale of an eccentric English family  Tom Freeman-Keel and Andrew Crofts  New York : Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2003  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. viii, 311 p. ; 24 cm. Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

One of these fellows was about seventy or upwards, and had a bald head and very gray whiskers. He had an old battered-up slouch hat on, and a greasy blue woollen shirt, and ragged old blue jeans britches stuffed into his boot-tops, and home-knit galluses — no, he only had one. He had an old long-tailed blue jeans coat with slick brass buttons flung over his arm, and both of them had big, fat, ratty-looking carpet-bags. The other fellow was about thirty, and dressed about as ornery. After breakfast we all laid off and talked, and the first thing that come out was that these chaps didn't know one another.

One of these fellows was about seventy or upwards, and had a bald head and very gray whiskers. He had an old battered-up slouch hat on, and a greasy blue woollen shirt, and ragged old blue jeans britches stuffed into his boot-tops, and home-knit galluses — no, he only had one. He had an old long-tailed blue jeans coat with slick brass buttons flung over his arm, and both of them had big, fat, ratty-looking carpet-bags. The other fellow was about thirty, and dressed about as ornery. After breakfast we all laid off and talked, and the first thing that come out was that these chaps didn’t know one another.

Shortly after the fourth Duke of Portland died in 1854, the fifth duke began construction of a fantastic underground palace beneath the family’s estate. Was it a physical representation of a secret underground life he was living as a London businessman with two families? In this work of historical detection, the authors reconstruct a century of controversy surrounding the Cavendish-Benticks, culminating in one of the most bizarre and publicized cases the British courts have ever seen.

A man steeped in layers of deliberately manufactured mystery, the fifth Duke of Portland — unmarried and childless — started life as Lord John Bentick, became the Marquess of Tichfield upon the suspicious death of his elder brother, and passed on his title to a cousin when he perished in 1879. But some claimed that he had forged a second identity as Thomas Druce, owner of the Baker Street Bazaar and subject of countless rumors about his secretive lifestyle throughout British high society.

Druce allegedly died in 1864, but his burial produced suspicion when it was claimed his coffin was filled with lead rather than a corpse. When Druce’s daughter-in-law surmised that he might have survived for 15 more years, she set out to shake the foundations of British society by proving that her son, Sidney Druce, was the rightful heir to the dukedom.

In a legal battle straight out of Alice in Wonderland — with accusations of madness, perjury, and even grave robbing — the previously unassailable aristocratic establishment threatened to topple. The Disappearing Duke is a most extraordinary and improbable tale that will delight history buffs, mystery lovers, Anglophiles, and anyone who delights in the absurd. An index with sources is included.

Comments Off on “Yes. My great-grandfather, eldest son of the Duke of Bilgewater, fled to this country about the end of the last century, to breathe the pure air of freedom; married here, and died, leaving a son, his own father dying about the same time. The second son of the late duke seized the titles and estates — the infant real duke was ignored. I am the lineal descendant of that infant — I am the rightful Duke of Bridgewater; and here am I, forlorn, torn from my high estate, hunted of men, despised by the cold world, ragged, worn, heart-broken, and degraded to the companionship of felons on a raft!” Mark Twain

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