Tag Archives: MacArthur – Douglas 1880-1964

The complete story of the legendary exploits and heroism of the thousands of courageous individuals who fought as spies, guerrillas, propagandists, and saboteurs behind enemy lines.

MacArthur’s undercover war : spies, saboteurs, guerrillas, and secret missions New York : J. Wiley and Sons, c 1995      William B. Breuer World War, 1939-1945 , Campaigns , Pacific Area, MacArthur, Douglas, 1880-1964 Hardcover. xii, 257 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 241-250) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Guadalcanal . . . Midway . . . the battle for the Philippines. In each of these critical conflicts, intelligence played a crucial role in bringing about an Allied victory. General MacArthur’s brilliant Pacific campaign was designed around espionage and guerrilla warfare. This is the story of his undercover war.

The covert war General Douglas MacArthur waged against Japanese forces in the Pacific arena was the largest undercover operation ever undertaken. Here, for the first time, is the complete story of the legendary exploits and heroism of the thousands of courageous individuals who fought as spies, guerrillas, propagandists, and saboteurs behind enemy lines.

When the Japanese war juggernaut overran the Philippines, it took a near miraculous PT-boat escape for MacArthur to make his way to safety in Australia. He left behind a force of seventy thousand American and Philippine troops marooned on the Bataan Peninsula. To these brave men the general vowed, “I shall return.” Against overwhelming odds, MacArthur succeeded.

Crucial to his success was his massive covert war effort. MacArthur created his own undercover warfare agency, the super-secret Allied Intelligence Bureau (AIB), to organize the many far-flung resistance groups.

They were the coast watchers–jungle-wise miners, traders and planters, missionaries, and telegraph operators who occupied remote Pacific islands, living in the most primitive conditions while keeping a constant vigil for Japanese movement.

They were American soldiers who escaped the Bataan Peninsula and were commanding guerrilla armies in the interior mountain and jungle locations of the Philippines.

And they were double agents operating right under the noses of the Japanese in Manila, occupying positions close to the Imperial Army and in the collaborationist Philippine government.

The phenomenal success of MacArthur’s island-hopping “hit-’em-where-they-ain’t” campaign was built on the accuracy of the intelligence gathered by the AIB. Early in the conflict, the Americans cracked the secret Japanese naval code and established a chain of intelligence radio-monitoring posts circling the Japanese empire from Alaska to Australia. The information garnered from their interceptions of Japanese transmissions and from operatives on the ground allowed MacArthur to pick soft targets–islands the Japanese had left relatively unguarded–for invasion. It was the steel nerves and unbounded resourcefulness of those who fought the secret war that paved the way for MacArthur’s “Great Return” to the Philippines and saved the lives of countless American soldiers.

In an action-packed narrative, MacArthur’s Undercover War tells of thrilling feats of valor and derring-do–impossible missions to blow up harbors, kidnap heads of state, undermine currency, and arrange prison escapes, all deep within enemy territory. Firsthand interviews with veterans and information from previously unpublished documents reveal a riveting tale of World War II that has never been fully told.

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