Tag Archives: Nuremberg

No punishment has ever possessed enough power of deterrence to prevent the commission of crimes. On the contrary, whatever the punishment, once a specific crime has appeared for the first time, its reappearance is more likely than its initial emergence could ever have been… Hannah Arendt

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We have an infatuation in this country with punishing the guilty. It may have started with the persecution of witches in colonial times but its political dimensions came to full boil with the pursuit of Pancho Villa and continued through the “pastoralization” of Germany favored by Morgenthau and the orgy of punishment at Nuremberg. It hasn’t stopped yet with the pursuits of both Saddam Hussein and Osama Bin Laden. While not arguing for the innocence of any of the criminals pursued there remains the question of what exactly was accomplished by sending Pershing into Mexico or Alexander Patch into Bavaria. Neither was a target of particular military value and especially in the latter case the army could have been sent east and left the Soviets without so much of Europe for the next fifty years. The men who followed the orders deserve credit and honor for everything they accomplished – it is the men who made the policy who remain suspect!

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In pursuit of Hitler: A Battlefield Guide to Bavaria Barnsley: Pen & Sword Military, 2008 Andrew Rawson World War, 1939-1945 Campaigns Germany, United States. Army. Army, 7th. History Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

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This book is a chronology of the Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and the famous victory drive of the Seventh Army. It starts at the Worms’ Rhine bridgehead and moves quickly onto Aschaffenburg, before describing the Hammelburg Raid to release US POWs. Driving South through Karlstadt the Army seized crossing of the River Mainz at Wurzburg.

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The seizure of Nuremberg was hugely symbolic and this beautiful city was the scene both of the infamous Nazi Rallies and of course the War Crimes Tribunals. The road to Munich is via the Danube crossings and the books takes in the liberation of the appalling Dachau Concentration Camp and the battle at the SS Barracks.

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Munich was the centre of Hitler‘s early life and represented his power base. He was imprisoned here and wrote Mein Kampf. The book climaxes with the approach to the Alps and the Eagle’s Nest suspected to be his last retreat rather than a bunker in Berlin.

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Comments Off on No punishment has ever possessed enough power of deterrence to prevent the commission of crimes. On the contrary, whatever the punishment, once a specific crime has appeared for the first time, its reappearance is more likely than its initial emergence could ever have been… Hannah Arendt

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Only the winners decide what were war crimes… Gary Wills

1389.9 Holocaust A

The original Nuremberg trials dealt with 24 individuals. The subsequent Nuremberg trials dealt with another 100 individuals – one of these, the Judges trial, was the subject of the Spenser Tracy movie, Judgement at Nuremberg, which was long on rhetoric and short on fact – in addition there were trials for almost all of the extermination camps and a number of other trials. Although it does not bear on this book some comparison may be made with the fact that 920 Japanese politicians and soldiers were executed for their participation in World War II. Considering that Hitler had 84 generals executed during the course of the war the pool of indictees was somewhat diminished. Consider for the moment that if the allies had lost the size of the pool of war criminals – even without losing the left howls so loudly about war crimes that we can readily understand why there are so few combat leaders left in the West. But this book is about the people who tried – and in some cases did – escape the victor’s trials and the subsequent fifty years of retaliation trials that have served little more than keeping old grievances alive. As we bury the last heroes of the war we should also bury the last of the hatreds that helped cause it before they set the world aflame again.

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Hunting evil: the Nazi War criminals who escaped and the quest to bring them to justice New York: Broadway Books, c 2009 Guy Walters World War, 1939-1945 Atrocities Hardcover. 1st American ed. and printing. 518 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., ports.; 25 cm. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

At the end of the Second World War, an estimated 30,000 Nazi war criminals fled from justice, including some of the highest ranking members of the Nazi Party. Many of them have names that resonate deeply in twentieth-century history – Eichmann, Mengele, Martin Bormann, and Klaus Barbie – not just for the monstrosity of their crimes, but also because of the shadowy nature of their post-war existence, holed up in the depths of Latin America, always one step ahead of their pursuers. Aided and abetted by prominent people throughout Europe, they hid in foreboding castles high in the Austrian alps, and were taken in by shady Argentine secret agents. The attempts to bring them to justice are no less dramatic, featuring vengeful Holocaust survivors, inept politicians, and daring plots to kidnap or assassinate the fugitives.

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In this interesting sidebar on World War II history journalist and novelist Guy Walters gives an account of one of the most shocking and important aspects of the war: how the most notorious Nazi war criminals escaped justice, how they were pursued, captured or able to remain free until their natural deaths and how the Nazis were assisted while they were on the run by “helpers” ranging from European sympathizers to a British camel doctor, and even members of Western intelligence services. Based on all new interviews with Nazi hunters and former Nazis and intelligence agents, travels along the actual escape routes, and archival research in Germany, Britain, the United States, Austria, and Italy, Hunting Evil debunks much of what has previously been understood about Nazis and Nazi hunters in the post war era, including myths about the alleged “Spider” and “Odessa” escape networks and the surprising truth about the world’s most legendary Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal.
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Comments Off on Only the winners decide what were war crimes… Gary Wills

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To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering… Friedrich Nietzsche

Neil Gregor is a lecturer in history at a minor English university and from the tenor of his works would have been delighted to see Morgenthau’s plans to pastoralize Germany after the second world war put into effect. This book is an attempt to portray the city of Nuremberg as marching in lock step with the Nazis and Nazism and prove that all they have done since the war is rend their garments and beat their breasts in plaintive cries of guilt. Not unlike his other work in which he attempts to prove that Mercedes Benz was responsible for the German war effort from an industrial perspective – and positioned itself uniquely to survive in a post Nazi Germany – the book is short on fact, those that are used are carefully selected and tailored, and long on conjecture and misrepresentations.

There can be no doubt that the excesses of the Nazis under Hitler were every bit as bad as the atrocities of Stalin and Mao. To blame an entire people, or even all of the people of a  single city, as complicit and exemplars of all of the vices of the regime you might as well blame Chicago or Detroit for Obama. You may reason from the universal to the particular – murder is a bad thing, John X has murdered, therefore John X has done a bad thing. If you reason from the particular to the universal you need to be a bit more careful – murder is a bad thing, John X has murdered using a knitting needle, knitting needles are dangerous weapons and need to be regulated… you can see the problem?

Haunted city : Nuremberg and the Nazi past New Haven [Conn.] ; London : Yale University Press, c 2008 Neil Gregor Nuremberg (Germany) History 20th century Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. xvi, 390 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [379]-380) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG  

Nuremberg — a city associated with Nazi excesses, party rallies, and the extreme anti-Semitic propaganda published by Hitler ally Julius Streicher —  has struggled since the Second World War to come to terms with the material and moral legacies of Nazism. This book explores how the Nuremberg community has confronted the implications of the genocide in which it participated, while also dealing with the appalling suffering of ordinary German citizens during and after the war. Neil Gregor’s compelling account of the painful process of remembering and acknowledging the Holocaust offers new insights into postwar memory in Germany and how it has operated.

Gregor takes a novel approach to the theme of memory, commemoration, and remembrance, and he proposes a highly nuanced explanation for the failure of Germans to face up to the Holocaust for years after the war. His book makes a major contribution to the social and cultural history of Germany.

Comments Off on To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering… Friedrich Nietzsche

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